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Today's Opinions

  • Kelly Dean Sanders Memorial fundraiser was a success

    On behalf of the Kelly Dean Sanders Memorial fund, I want to thank the community for your generous support of the Kelly Dean Sanders Memorial Fund. 

    While this fund helps needy children all year, the holiday season is one of our main fundraising times.

  • COLUMN: How about starting resolutions in December?

     “Traditionally” a lot of people make resolutions at the beginning of each new year on the calendar.
    This year, I started making some starting Dec. 1. Why now?  Maybe it has been in part to celebrate surviving eight months of a very intense schedule, going full speed all the time. Maybe it is just a streak of perversity, a type of push back to all the “you have to” messages coming at us from too many directions. Whatever ….

  • COLUMN: Santa letters bring out the bad and the beautiful

    How are you sir? I’m fine. Since you’re a nice guy will you give the homeless houses to live in or money please? If I’ve been bad sorry cause I want toys and other stuf. How is Ms. Claus? Is she doing good? I hope so, if she isn’t than I’m sorry. How old is Rudolph? I bet hes old. If hes dead, than sorry. So what about his parents. Same thing I said last time. And say to the reindeer that I said “hi.” List of toys fish and make it were I can go to my dads and more toys. And well leave you some milk and cookies.
     

  • EDITORIAL: Newspaper's stance improves transparency in justice system

    Last week was a small victory for the public's right to know thanks to The Courier Journal, which played the important role of watchdog.

    All of it started when the CJ asked the state's court system why 3,600 cases had been sealed from public view during the last decade. Sadly when asked, the court system officials admitted they knew little about the cases - including why they were closed, if they were closed properly and if they should remain closed at this time.

  • LETTER: There is a need for adoptive families

    November is National Adoption Month, a time set aside each year to raise awareness about the adoption of children and youth from foster care. This is also an ideal time to highlight the tremendous efforts put forth to improve the lives of children in foster care and to stress the growing need for quality foster parents in our community.

    More than 6,800 children in the state of Kentucky are in foster care. The reasons why vary.

    Some biological parents aren’t able to give appropriate physical and emotional care or supervision.

  • LETTER: Ensure your pets have adequate shelter

    Winter, with its bitter wind, rain and snow, is rapidly approaching. Now is the time to check our doghouses, patching and repairing all cracks and leaks. It is also time for new, clean bedding, whether it is straw, blankets or carpeting, this bedding will need to be replaced often; putting a board along the bottom of the door opening will help keep the bedding inside the house. Also, turning the door away from the wind helps protect your dog from the cold.

  • Readers assist with Bloyd's Cafe token mystery

    A couple of weeks ago, Tim Meredith contacted The LaRue County Herald News, seeking information about a token.

    His letter said: “A friend was searching through his pocket change for a soda and noticed a token from H.M. Bloyds Café, Hodgenville, in the mix. He, knowing I am a life-long resident of Hodgenville, gave it to me…. I wonder if anyone has heard of the business and possibly the location and era. The token lettering is in very good condition and the beer must have been cheap.”

  • COLUMN: This Christmas, look back at life's lessons

    When I was a child I celebrated Christmas the same way children celebrate today. I demanded the most expensive gifts, never clothes, and if I didn’t get what I wanted I threw a fit.

    After years of hearing my dad tell of how Christmas was when he was a kid, I finally woke up and listened.

    Dad lived in the country, down a dirt road, in Stephensburg. My Mamaw and Papaw were poor as a pluck-feathered hen. Papaw worked in the rock quarry down the road and Mamaw stayed home, raising eight kids in a two-bedroom house on a piece of land they called their home.