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Today's Opinions

  • Wintry weather was a challenge for newspaper staff

    It’s not BREAKING news that last week’s snow and ice weather event was challenging for all of us trying to get from home to work, to the grocery, doctor’s appointments, etc., but it was a challenge for our team as well, getting your local news out to you on a timely manner.

  • Just ask

    If you see someone throwing out garbage on the side of the road – who do you call to turn them in?

    Has anyone ever been fined $500 (per the road signs) for throwing out garbage?

    Who do you call about an excessive amount of garbage on the side of the road? (Specifically, the area on Bardstown Road at the foot of Red Hill Cemetery).

    ~•~

     

    LaRue County Solid Waste Coordinator Jill Gray responded:

  • Lot of history at Little Mount

    It has been a process that has taken years, but at long last, one of the most historic cemeteries in LaRue County has a proper marker.

    On Feb. 12, 2015, as part of the Lincoln Birthday Celebration, a marker, donated by the Captain Jacob Van Meter Chapter, National Society, Daughters of the American Revolution, was unveiled on Leafdale Road. (The actual ceremony took place at Ovesen Heights Baptist Church, due to inclement weather.)

  • COLUMN: He's driving again with Mary

    Madison “Mac” Mather died, at the age of 100, on Friday the 13th.

    Many of us think it would be lucky indeed to live to that ripe old age –especially if we could stay in our own homes as did Mr. Mather.

    No matter how old we grow, few of us will reach the legendary status of Mr. Mather. He was the embodiment of the very best country songs.

    I don’t think he would have minded being described in such terms. The last time we spoke, he talked about his love of music and how he loved to call square dances in his younger days.

  • 1914 fire reshaped Hodgenville

    I completely missed it.

    Last week, as I was doing a little research on the history of Hodgenville (remember, three years until the bicentennial), I came across a clipping of an event that occurred 100 years ago.

    A fire destroyed much of downtown Hodgenville on April 28, 1914. Twenty-six businesses in the northwest quadrant of Lincoln Square turned to ashes that night. The event put a damper on the City’s 100th year celebration.

    Most of the businesses that were rebuilt can be seen on the square today.

  • Guest editorial: Eminent domain battle

    Kentucky’s Rand Paul was one of only two Republicans in the Senate who voted to protect the property rights of those whose homes and farms lie in the path of the proposed Keystone XL Pipeline.

    Paul supports the crude-oil pipeline but saw that something bigger is at stake when private companies claim the power to seize property that is not theirs. Paul might have been playing to his Tea Party base, but his vote kept the faith with rural Kentuckians across the political spectrum.

  • Hodgenville’s 200th anniversary is looming

    It has been seven years since the nation observed the bicentennial of the birth of Abraham Lincoln.

    Local celebrations, which included the national kickoff in February 2008 and the release of a new Lincoln penny the following year, were squashed by ice storms. The weather was a disappointment, but the community – the birthplace of arguably the greatest American president – pulled together and put on a party for Abe.

    Another bicentennial is on the horizon.

  • JUST ASK: Why has the mayor not made an attempt to recover bond monies that is due to the City of Hodgenville?

    Generally speaking, a bond guarantees the honesty and faithful performance of a public official’s duties. Bonds protect the interest of taxpayers.

    The question revolves around the alleged wrongdoing by former city clerk/treasurer MaDonna Hornback. She has been indicted on 54 counts of abuse of public trust; and one count of theft by unlawful taking – but she is considered innocent unless or until proven guilty in a court of law.

    As city clerk/treasurer, Hornback was bonded.