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Today's Opinions

  • Report is a first step we need to continue

    There is nothing about the death or near death of a child, at the hands of their caretaker, which can be viewed positively. Despite this sad and stark reality, we at Prevent Child Abuse Kentucky are encouraged by the release of the second annual report from the Child Fatality and Near Fatality External Review Panel. This report reflects the work of a dedicated and voluntary multi-disciplinary group of professionals (including a PCAK representative). The Panel’s commitment to data driven, solution focused recommendations are readily apparent in this report.

  • Blame game: Generation gap turns into Boomer slap

    I was speaking with a longtime friend the other day and he commented: “It seems to me that our community has lost a lot of ‘the good, ol’ people’ lately.”

    I had to agree. The obituary page in The LaRue County Herald News has been full of names of people who have been mainstays of goodness, kindness and charity. Some of them much older than me – others not so much.

    It seems their deaths cluster around holidays – something that has puzzled me for years.

  • Holiday marks change, growth

    Thanksgiving is an oft-forgotten holiday. It’s sandwiched right between Halloween and Christmas, the two most marketed, celebrated holidays of the year, and generally, we don’t get or give presents on Thanksgiving. The gift of this holiday is time.

    Time with family, time to stop and reflect on what we have and time to slow down and eat a meal with those we may not see very often.

  • Scientist’s goof created cooking history

    If you prepared a home-cooked meal at Thanksgiving, the chances are good that you had help from CorningWare.

    Chances are great that you received that sturdy, do-it-all cookware as a wedding gift – or handed down from your mom. There are skillets, cake pans, casserole dishes, coffee pots, grab-it bowls (my favorites) and pie plates. Most can go from the refrigerator straight to the oven. Just try to break one. It’s nearly impossible.

  • UK’s airsoft gun incident unacceptable, but will be a valuable lesson

    The only sounds that Kentucky football’s Class of 2014 was supposed to cause were Air Raid sirens and cheering on Saturday afternoons.

    Now, after a Sunday night in September, four of them (Dorian Baker, Stanley Boom Williams, Drew Barker and Tymere Dubose) will instead be known for the sound of three airsoft guns being shot into the air in the middle of South Campus, and the subsequent pinging of 30,000 students’ cell phones alerting them to a campus-wide lockdown.

  • Mom’s magic returns for Thanksgiving

    My mother, who has been gone for 10 years, performed magic every Thanksgiving.

    Somehow, she managed to have ripe, garden-grown tomatoes on the table, year after year. They were always the last ones of the season and we knew we’d have to wait another seven or eight months for the next taste.

    A ripe tomato on an Old Town Blue Corelle plate, surrounded by a slice of turkey and a pile of homemade mashed potatoes and green beans seasoned with a bit of bacon: If there is anything better on Thanksgiving – I don’t know what it is.

  • Indisposable Concept documents the world through a $10 lens

    The Indisposable Concept is a photography project based out of Australia, in which people use disposable cameras to take pictures of what they consider “indisposable.” Basically, they want you to document the world around you via the lens of a disposable camera. Afterward, you’re supposed to send the pictures to them, either by email or by mailing in the camera itself. They then post the pictures on their website and social media accounts.

    It started in Australia, but has since garnered a worldwide following.

  • Wedding gowns turned into gifts for grieving families

    My daughter is a NICU (neonatal intensive-care unit) nurse who takes care of some of the tiniest, most fragile babies born in the state. She has never disclosed a name or even hinted at anything that would violate the privacy of her patients. But I can tell – by the few things she has said – it is a difficult job.

    Most of her patients thrive and are able to go home. Some of the families do not get that happy ending. My daughter is sometimes called upon to care for the little ones after they have died.