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Columns

  • COLUMN: Clean up paper clutter

    Despite our best attempts at home organization, many of us are constantly bombarded with paper. Paper is the most common type of clutter. When you think about it, this is not really surprising considering the amount of junk mail, bills, coupons, completed schoolwork and publications that many of us have lying on tables or stuffed in drawers at our homes.

    You can get a handle on this type of clutter by following these tips:

    * Immediately act when you get a new piece of paper. Read it, file it, shred it, recycle or throw it in the trash.

  • The moon is always round

    For the past month I have been working on stories for my newspaper’s month-long emphasis on breast cancer.

    I’m up to my eyebrows in breast cancer research and have talked with a number of women who are either actively in treatment for this disease or are counting the months and years of being a survivor.

  • An ouch of prevention is worth more than a pound of cure

    One of our readers remembered a column I penned on Oct. 25, 1995. What is more amazing is that he requested it be reprinted. A lot of things have changed in the last 18 years. Please keep that in mind as you read this piece in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month.
    ~•~

    Warning: This column deals with a sensitive topic. It has been deemed offensive by my children. The faint of heart should proceed directly to the Lifestyles page.

  • Pioneer spirit: Fun and generosity combined for unique event

    Rain did not wreck our Lincoln Days.

    A downpour cut short the festivities and events were moved around a bit. There were a few hitches – and no doubt, some disappointments – but overall, it was an excellent festival.

    Many participants embraced the “Lincoln Goes Hollywood” theme and you just had to smile when you saw Abe Lincoln walk by wearing a pair of glitter sunglasses.

  • Calling for the death of a rumor

    I know of newspapers that kept their communities informed about clean water and shelter during terrible storms and disasters.

    I know of newspapers that exposed crooks, lost a lot of advertising from the crooks’ buddies and still put out a paper every week.

    I know of a newspaper that had an ironic sense of humor that even offended a few readers and stood its ground with a “come on people, have a brain” retort.

    I know of publishers who took pay cuts during the recession rather than cut staff.

  • Good news is a welcome change

    LaRue Countians have had more than our share of bad news of late. So many deaths and injuries in a short period of time ....

    I was more than ready for some good news when I learned of the school district’s latest test scores (Unbridled Learning).

    The district – already shining at 20th out of 174 districts – made the leap to 14th in the state. That is quite an accomplishment for any district, much less one of the smallest in the state.

    Abraham Lincoln Elementary jumped from 274th out of 733 to 258th out of 730 schools.

  • Expanding Medicaid: A foolish way to improve healthcare access

    United States Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius recently said “that if you want a healthier population, looking at the opportunity to expand Medicaid has got to be a piece of the puzzle.”

    Expansion of Medicaid – the jointly run federal-state health plan for low-income Americans – has long been an essential element of progressives’ vision for healthcare “reform.”

  • State’s rural population is shrinking

    In the broadest sense, the population changes Kentucky has seen over the last 50 years have largely fallen in line with the country as a whole.

    We have both become increasingly urban, for example, with Kentucky’s tipping point coming in 1970, when the U.S. Census found for the first time that more than half of our citizens lived in or near a city. Both of us are also witnessing the same graying trend, which is no surprise because of advances in medicine and the growing number of Baby Boomers reaching retirement age.

  • Mystery 4-H trophy turns up in Louisville

    LaRue County 4-H Agent Misty Wilmoth is looking for more information about a 4-H trophy engraved with dates from the late 1930s to the early 1940s.
    According to Wilmoth, “a gentleman just moved into a house he bought in Louisville. In the basement, tucked away, he found this LaRue County 4-H trophy.  He contacted the previous owner of the home and they said they didn’t leave anything behind. He contacted the State 4-H Office in order to get in contact with LaRue County 4-H.  

  • We remember 9-11

    Some days are etched in our memory as though they are historical markers, and recalling them causes us to remember where we were and what we were doing as those events unfolded. Such are the assassination of President Kennedy and the attack upon the World Trade Center. This week we have been recalling Sept. 11, 2001.

    Nearly 3,000 Americans died that day in the terrorists attacks upon the World Trade Center, the Pentagon, and in the rural fields in Pennsylvania.