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Columns

  • Here's to the sunny slopes of long ago

    There are few of us in LaRue County who have not been touched in some manner by Sunrise Manor Nursing Home.

  • COLUMN: Remembering JFK

     On Friday, our country will mark the 50th anniversary of one of its most tragic events: the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

    Like the attack on Pearl Harbor before it and 9/11 after it, Nov. 22, 1963, is one of a handful of dates in history where those old enough to remember it will never forget where they were and what they were doing.

  • COLUMN: Remembering Sergeant York

     As the people of our little town slowly gathered into the old stone railroad depot that 150 years ago this month was itself the center of a life and death struggle between soldiers for North and South, we anxiously gathered to celebrate America’s veterans.

    A talented brass band – the Jericho Brass awaited making final tunings for the evening concert of patriotic music.

  • COLUMN: Five years later, my friends help me remember

     Anniversaries are thought of as joyful occasions. Birthdays, weddings, engagements, first dates – all bring smiles.

  • COLUMN: Honor the veteran

     He may have been referring to the members of the Royal Air Force, but when British Prime Minister Winston Churchill said, “Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few,” he could easily have been talking about our own country’s veterans.

    They make up less than 8 percent of the United States’ population, but it is no overstatement to say our lives would be very different without their countless contributions and sacrifices.

  • COLUMN: Clean up paper clutter

    Despite our best attempts at home organization, many of us are constantly bombarded with paper. Paper is the most common type of clutter. When you think about it, this is not really surprising considering the amount of junk mail, bills, coupons, completed schoolwork and publications that many of us have lying on tables or stuffed in drawers at our homes.

    You can get a handle on this type of clutter by following these tips:

    * Immediately act when you get a new piece of paper. Read it, file it, shred it, recycle or throw it in the trash.

  • The moon is always round

    For the past month I have been working on stories for my newspaper’s month-long emphasis on breast cancer.

    I’m up to my eyebrows in breast cancer research and have talked with a number of women who are either actively in treatment for this disease or are counting the months and years of being a survivor.

  • An ouch of prevention is worth more than a pound of cure

    One of our readers remembered a column I penned on Oct. 25, 1995. What is more amazing is that he requested it be reprinted. A lot of things have changed in the last 18 years. Please keep that in mind as you read this piece in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month.
    ~•~

    Warning: This column deals with a sensitive topic. It has been deemed offensive by my children. The faint of heart should proceed directly to the Lifestyles page.

  • Pioneer spirit: Fun and generosity combined for unique event

    Rain did not wreck our Lincoln Days.

    A downpour cut short the festivities and events were moved around a bit. There were a few hitches – and no doubt, some disappointments – but overall, it was an excellent festival.

    Many participants embraced the “Lincoln Goes Hollywood” theme and you just had to smile when you saw Abe Lincoln walk by wearing a pair of glitter sunglasses.

  • Calling for the death of a rumor

    I know of newspapers that kept their communities informed about clean water and shelter during terrible storms and disasters.

    I know of newspapers that exposed crooks, lost a lot of advertising from the crooks’ buddies and still put out a paper every week.

    I know of a newspaper that had an ironic sense of humor that even offended a few readers and stood its ground with a “come on people, have a brain” retort.

    I know of publishers who took pay cuts during the recession rather than cut staff.