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Columns

  • Green hay can combust

    Several hay fires have already occurred this year, and growers should be aware of the potential for additional ones. When hay is baled too wet, hay or barn fires can occur.

    However, hay fires can generally be prevented if hay is baled at appropriate moisture and the temperature of recently baled hay monitored.

    Hay usually will go through a heating phase within one to two weeks after baling. During this time, hay should be monitored to ensure it does not reach temperatures that can damage the hay or lead to spontaneous combustion (fire).

  • Opportunity and economic growth rely on a skilled workforce

    The column, Work Matters, is a project of the Lincoln Trail Workforce Investment Board. It is devoted to exploring workforce quality and economic development issues in the region.

    As a small business owner, I learned many years ago that my success is dependent on a team of loyal, skilled employees. Ask any large employer, and they’ll tell you the same. A business can’t exist, a profit can’t be made and an economy can’t thrive without skilled employees.

  • Have a happy, safe summer

    It’s seems like summer is jam-packed with activity – kids’ sporting events, family cookouts, swimming, and vacations. How do you fit in all the yard work that comes with owning a home? Is it OK to take shortcuts? Think about this: More than 100,000 people seek medical treatment each year for injuries caused by lawnmowers, trimmers, fertilizers and pesticides. Instead of rushing through your summertime chores, keep the following tips in mind to ensure safety all summer long.

    • Never start the mower indoors.

  • Tips can improve home canning techniques

     The LaRue County Extension office has a variety of free publications on home canning and freezing. Stop by at 807 Old Elizabethtown Road in Hodgenville or call our office (270-358-3401) for a copy of any of our titles such as home canning basics; jams and jellies; vegetables; tomato products and salsa; and pickled and fermented foods.

    Q. What causes lids not to seal?

    A. Failure of lids to seal may be caused by one or more of the following:

  • COLUMN: When cultures collide, point and grunt

    My husband Bud and I were working in the back yard last week, when a minivan pulled into the driveway.
    A dark-skinned man got out and started talking – in broken English – to Bud. The only word I could understand was “Gord.”
    More men got out of the van and walked around the house until finally, five of them were chattering at us.

  • Facebook: A lovely place to hang out and hate

    Ah... Facebook! The place we all go to keep tabs on our friends, enjoy seeing pictures of family, crush candy and, of course, threaten each other. Whether you’re a liberal, a conservative or just someone who doesn’t quite have grammar mastered, you’ve probably had an angry tirade against you show up on your newsfeed sometime this week or, let’s face it, you might have posted some yourself.

  • Grad parents, your jobs are just beginning

    Congratulations to the recent LaRue County High School graduates.

    More importantly, congratulations to graduates’ parents. Your child’s diploma belongs just as much to you as it does to them. You spent 18 years packing lunches, helping them with homework, and serving as your child’s personal chauffeur as you carted them to school, sports practices, and back home again.

  • Enjoy these days, it gets real, really fast

    Many things have changed since the day I graduated only two years ago from LaRue County High School. Most notably is that graduation is now held outside on the football field – something that graduating seniors pushed for – for many years. Apparently, I graduated only one year too early, because the very next year, they moved graduation to the football field – making us the last class to have graduated in the gym (so far).

  • Column: Where we're from

    The trees are changing their leaves and the scent of spring is in the air at LCHS. Another spring means another set of finals, end of tem assessments and another graduation. This time it’s us.

    We’ve traveled to school every day for 13 consecutive years now. I can’t believe how fast the time has passed.

  • Plan ahead for successful summer canning

    Whether you’ve been canning for years or are just starting out, now’s the time to plan ahead, so that you’ll be ready to make the most of this summer’s fresh fruits and vegetables.

    First, you need to decide which type of canner you’ll be using. There are two types of canners available: boiling water canners and pressure canners. A boiling water canner can safely be used to can high-acid foods like fruits, jams, jellies, pickles and acidified tomato products.