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Columns

  • COLUMN: Teens have brought the 'good kind' of attention to LaRue

    LaRue County has produced a splendid crop of young people. It’s difficult to keep up with all their accomplishments.
    Here are a few of the most recent:
    Bright-eyed, sweet-toned Kenzi Lewis has accomplished at age 15 what many people only dream of  – performing on a Hollywood stage on American Idol. She lasted a couple of weeks on the TV show and we were sorry to see her leave.  I have a feeling she’ll be back on that stage in the future.

  • COLUMN: Several agencies appreciate gift of donated textbooks

    Each semester college students purchase textbooks to accompany their upcoming classes. The books are often mandatory and carry a hefty price tag.
    Some students will use these books, others will not, but either way they’re stuck to pay the price. The only incentive of the purchase is that at the end of the semester most college bookstores have a “book buyback.” Although buy back pricing is severely lower than original purchase price, it gives students a little money in their pocket … sometimes.

  • COLUMN: Lewis found new calling at Salem Christian

    Sunday evening, it was standing room only as congregation members from Salem Christian, Union Christian and various other churches came together to witness the ordination of Sidney E. Lewis to the Christian ministry.
    I’ve known Pastor Lewis for many years, he once coached my son in minor league ball; his wife, Judy, was a speech therapist at the school, also working with my son. But, it wasn’t until I began attending Union Christian Church that I began to know Sidney Lewis.

  • COLUMN: Diaper age is full of new products and same old poo

    My daughter Amanda called the other day and said she had decided to make the switch to cloth diapers.
    I thought this was an excellent choice as young Lucy will celebrate her first birthday Saturday and with baby number three due in June, Amanda will be going through a lot of diapers. Disposable diapers are so handy but they are expensive and are not environmentally-friendly.

  • COLUMN: Snow days won't always be fun

    I'd like to address this column to all students, K-12, to let you know an important truth. You need to learn this early so you can fully appreciate it. It doesn't matter if you're 5 or 18 - it applies the same to all

    Here it is: Snow days will not be fun once you graduate.

    That might sound simple enough, and you might think you already know it. But trust me – those snow days are among the best times of your life.

  • COLUMN: No improvements needed for 'True Grit' - but filmmakers made them anyway

    When I heard that someone was remaking the movie classic “True Grit,” my first thought was “why.”
    Remakes are generally a waste of time and a movie like “True Grit” needs no improvements. As corny as it sounds, one of my favorite scenes in the 1969 film is John Wayne as one-eyed, cranky Rooster Cogburn on horseback, reins in teeth and Colts in both hands, charging the bad guys.

  • COLUMN: Random drug tests a good idea for welfare recipients

    Under a newly proposed bill – House Bill 208 – state recipients of food stamps, Medicaid or other state assistance could face losing their benefits if they can’t pass a drug test.
    The bill, proposed by Rep. Lonnie Napier, R-Lancaster, has already won the backing of House Speaker Greg Stumbo, D-Prestonburg. I think he might be onto something as well.

  • COLUMN: Smiling faces can be evil clowns in disguise ... and I got proof

    My husband Bud and I were talking about ourselves the other day.
    We determined that we are not big grinners. That sometimes is off-putting to people who are big grinners.
    Smiley People sometimes try to “cheer us up.” The thing is, we may not be glum at the moment. We just look it.
    At times, we have misunderstood “Smiley Person’s” motive and think they are simply obnoxious.

  • COLUMN: Meeting corrections challenges means finding common ground

    It is uncommon – especially in these days of polarizing political rhetoric – to find two people with significantly different points of view working toward the same goal. Yet that is exactly the situation we find ourselves in as members of a state task force that is looking for solutions to Kentucky's big – and growing – challenges in corrections spending.

  • COLUMN: If you don't want it in ink, don't do it

    Last week my husband and I went to dinner. A simple, pleasant dinner, until I heard “it.”
    “It” was the remark that the paper, this paper, had printed false information about a particular person. I didn’t catch the person’s name they were referring to but I would have liked to know. The few key words I did catch were “in jail, meth and wrongly accused.”