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Columns

  • COLUMN: Veterans deserve our show of respect

    Veterans Day, celebrated annually on Nov. 11, was set aside as a day to be dedicated to honor veterans who selflessly exhibited patriotism, love for country and willingness to take the sacrifice that accompanies serving our great nation.
    The day often is celebrated with patriotic ceremonies, speeches, presentations and parades. It is most definitely a day in which the community should support and be involved – wholeheartedly.

  • COLUMN: Veterans are worthy of honor

    Originally Remembrance Day was set aside to remember and honor those who gave their lives in the wars of 1914-18 and 1939-45, but today we remember those who fought and died in all wars.

  • COLUMN: LaRue's Relay for Life needs you

     BY AMANDA BALES AND MELISSA WILLIAMSON

  • COLUMN: Riding with a trooper is not for the faint-hearted

    The good thing about my job is that it’s relatively safe. I have no worries of large machinery lopping my hand off, being run over while doing roadwork, or getting attacked by wild beasts – unless you consider some select people wild beasts.

    So when the opportunity arose to “live a little” and go through the Kentucky State Police citizens police academy, I jumped on it.

  • COLUMN: The value of irritating people

    Perhaps the best thing about writing a column is having a forum to work out what I believe.

    It’s also a great place to air my petty beefs and hope that somehow I can find a nugget of truth about God and his kingdom to help us all.

    But mostly I just like to publicly tattle about people who irritate me.

    For example, people who invade my personal space. This happens mostly at Walmart while at the register waiting for my grocery total.

  • COLUMN: 'Polio Sundays' saved lives 50 years ago

    I got a flu shot last week. It didn’t hurt and I got a nice booklet of coupons for my trouble.
    It seems that getting an annual vaccination for a variety of ills has turned routine, something we take for granted. One local pharmacy will even bring the shots to your workplace.
    But it wasn’t always that way.
    There have been times, in the not-so-distant past, that preventative measures were not available to the public. Epidemics occurred. People became sick and sometimes died.
    The best you could do was avoid everybody and pray.

  • Trailer no match for 'old men wrecking crew'

    Charles Hagan Edlin and his wife Mary live in a large two-story house in Hodgenville. Mary’s great-grandfather Wilbur Vaughn built the house in 1903.
    Mary is the fourth generation of the Vaughn family to live in this house. She and Charles Hagan have bought a smaller, more modern house with a smaller lot and plan to auction their old house later this month.

  • COLUMN: Shopper's confidence takes a hit at gun show

    I am not a great shopper.

    My husband Bud would disagree. But that’s because he is a man and has little concept of what a real shopper is like. He can walk in Wal-Mart, go directly to his favorite jar of peanut butter, pick it up, walk directly to the checkout and be done.

    It’s almost Old Testament in its intensity: “Thou shalt go directly to the Jif. Thou shalt not look to the left, nor to the right, lest thou be tempted.”

    I enjoy looking – and buying when something calls to me. But the looking – that’s key.

  • COLUMN: Lincoln Days - cold or hot - warms the heart

    The 36th annual Lincoln Days Festival was deceptively chilly on Saturday: blue skies and sunshine with a tendency to turn cold and windy. It made for a slight crowd Saturday morning, but as expected, hundreds of people poured into town just before the parade.
    It warmed up on Sunday afternoon – and the crowds turned out in force again.
    As always, the entertainment was top notch and there were plenty of activities for the family. And, it’s good to see old friends and catch up on news – the birth of new grandchildren, retirements and job changes.

  • COLUMN: Five monkeys - a classic tale of peer pressure

    This week’s column involves a banana, a ladder, a cage full of monkeys, and a psychologist with a fire hose, with overtones of social parody. I'm not referring to the most recent episode of Family Guy, but rather, a psychological study that is rumored to have taken place in the late 1960s.