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Columns

  • Thank God for our children

    A small town makes big news.

    Indeed, we have.

    Miss Ivy Brown, LaRue County’s very own Miss Kentucky Basketball, has been a welcome blast of fresh air to offset the stale stink of scandal we have seemed to attract in recent weeks.

    Ivy, we are so proud of the way you have conducted yourself on and off the court.

  • Scars, suspicion follow chick war

     We hatched out a batch of chicks this spring.

    I had a feeling they would be rowdy birds as soon as they began hatching – the first one exploded out of the shell and immediately began screaming at the world. Six more chicks followed.

    We lost two under odd circumstances. After recent events, I’m pretty sure they were assassinated by their brothers and sisters.

    The remaining five seemed healthy enough. They were fluffy and cute and picture-perfect. But one day, I came home from work and found carnage inside the brooder.

  • COLUMN: Jeremy Williams shares his survivor story

     At age 21 what were you doing?

    I had started my career, enjoyed playing basketball, racing cars, and riding 4-wheelers. One day all those things came to a halt when cancer became part of my life.

    My name is Jeremy Williams. I grew up in Buffalo, in a good home with great parents, Mike and Marcia Williams. They took me to church every time the doors were open; that helped lay my foundation for a faith that was going to be tested in a major way.

  • COLUMN: School board considered several factors in decision

     As was reported in The LaRue County Herald News last week, the LaRue County Board of Education voted to make June 4, 2014 closing day for students.  Graduation will be Friday, June 6.

    Despite missing 13 days of school, a full week of Spring Break is intact and everyone is off Memorial Day.

  • Clarification needed to protect property rights

    Last March a land agent showed up at my door to inform me that two private companies wanted to install a pipeline for natural gas liquids on my farm. It would originate in Pennsylvania and West Virginia and join with an existing pipeline in Hardinsburg, which would link it to Louisiana. I was shocked and told the man I was not overjoyed with that news. But his response set me back even farther when he stated that they felt their project would have eminent domain power, meaning they could come through my property whether I like it or not.

  • Smells like spring in the country

     My daughter Amanda and the three granddaughters visited a couple of weeks ago.

    The sun was down, the moon was out and the stars were twinkling as she loaded Claire, Lucy and Jillian into the van. She commented on “how much brighter the stars seem in the country” as she was leaving.

    “They’re here every night,” I told her.

    As she drove toward the big city, she told the girls how much she missed the openness and the quiet of the country.

  • COLUMN: President should end spin-control culture

     When the Valley Journals of Riverton, Utah, a suburb of Salt Lake City, wanted to know the time of the town’s 2012 Easter egg hunt, they couldn’t find out. The city barred the parks official from speaking to reporters without permission, and nothing, not even the Second Coming, would pry that information loose.

    What Valley Journals Managing Editor Linda Petersen experienced is unfortunately all too common – and becoming more so – in Utah, Washington, D.C., and other government shops across the country.

  • COLUMN: Sunshine Week

     March 16-22 is Sunshine Week nationwide. Take a moment to celebrate. Sunshine Week focuses on the importance of open government. No open government, no democracy. No transparency, no government accountability.

    I care about Sunshine Week both as a citizen and as a former newspaper employee/publisher for 22 years. We relied heavily upon the State of New Mexico’s strong public records and opening meeting acts to help keep public officials accountable and public bodies honest.

  • Hear the train, it's going to rain

    On Saturday, my husband Bud visited a friend who lives in the vicinity of Nolin Baptist Church.
    He said he could hear the train running at Glendale several miles away – something that occurs only as bad weather is approaching. The phenomenon is due to the cold air being a good sound conductor.
    Anyway, he said it’s a reliable method of predicting bad weather – for that area of the county at least.
    I had my own weather predictor Saturday. It was Old Uncle Arthur – and he is never wrong.

  • COLUMN: Welcome to the 'All Access' Herald News

     Well good morning, LaRue County! You may be asking the question, “I received a LaRue County Herald News newspaper today – why?”