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Today's News

  • PHOTO: Stormie's Stitches has ribbon-cutting
  • Rosalie Bell celebrates 95th birthday

    Rosalie Metcalf Bell of Wyanet, Ill. will celebrate her 95th birthday on Feb. 9, 2014.
    She was born Feb 9, 1919, in Athertonville, and lived in LaRue County several years before moving to Illinois.
    She retired from Harper Wyman in Princeton, Ill., and also worked at Hollywood Vasserette and Perry Memorial Hospital in Princeton.
    In the late 1950’s Rosalie and her former husband, the late Donald Bell, managed the Blue Ribbon Luncheonette located in the Hodgenville square beneath the Masonic Lodge across from the statue of Abraham Lincoln.

  • Baby Lincoln's marker will be donated to National Park

    A triangular piece of limestone has been donated to the Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historic Park.
    The stone is believed to be the original grave marker for Thomas Lincoln Jr. – the younger brother of Abraham Lincoln. It will be unveiled at a Feb. 12 ceremony in the Visitor Center at the Park.
    Local Attorney Carl Howell Jr., a longtime collector of Lincoln memorabilia, came into possession of the marker in the 1970s. He displayed it at his family’s Nancy Lincoln Inn adjacent to the Park.

  • Charlie will be missed
  • Judge reviews file in city hall case

     

    LaRue Circuit Judge Charles Simms III held an “in camera review” Monday of several documents involved in the investigation of Hodgenville City Hall.

    The judge is determining whether written, text and Internet communications of a “purely private nature” between Hodgenville Mayor Terry Cruse and City Clerk/Treasurer MaDonna Hornback will remain confidential.

    An in camera review is closed to the public and press and allows the judge to review documents in private to determine if they will be made public.

  • Two killed in crash

    Two LaRue County men died in a two-vehicle collision Jan. 29 outside Buffalo.
    Thomas Eugene “Blue” Underwood, 45, of Buffalo, was driving a 2006 Kia southbound on U.S. 61 near the LaRue County Country Club about 4 p.m. He apparently veered into the northbound lane. The Kia struck a northbound 2004 Dodge Caravan driven by Anthony Worner, 36, of Buffalo, head-on, according to LaRue County Sheriff Merle Edlin.

  • Friends, family remember Ashley

    Words spoken at a memorial service for Ashley Long Jan. 31 at LaRue County Middle School assured the relatives, students, and school staff that though gone, she will not be forgotten.
    Eleven-year-old Long, a sixth-grade student, lost her four-year battle with leukemia Jan. 8. As a celebration of her life, the student body filed into the school’s gymnasium to hear teachers and Long’s classmate and friend, Sydney Pepper, speak briefly about the positive influence the daughter of Todd and Linda Long had on all those around her.

  • COLUMN: Pasture renovation pays

    Renovating pastures and hay fields to renew grass productivity is one of the most important things LaRue County farmers can do to improve their pasture and hay fields. Pastures and other forages feed the county’s 24,000 head of cattle and calves in addition to the other ruminant livestock and horses. It will soon be time to renovate this year.

    Pasture renovation (seeding legumes, usually clover, into an established grass stand) is a win-win situation because it decreases production costs and increases animal performance, which should result in increased income.

  • Division of Forestry is collecting seeds

    Have you ever heard the expression, “from one small seed, a mighty tree can grow?” It means that things of lasting value often start small, even though the final results may not be seen for years.

  • New bee virus is mutating

    A new, rapidly mutating virus that leaps from plants to honeybees is threatening agriculture that relies on the bees to pollinate about 90 crops worldwide and generates $14 billion a year, according to a Department of Agriculture study published in the journal mBio. It could be another cause of colony collapse disorder, in which whole hives of bees die.