.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Soybean field production summary

    Soybeans are in the fields for about six months of the year in LaRue County. Let’s look at a brief summary of grower actions during these months.
    May: Full‑season soybean planting should begin by mid May. Growers will burn down or till weeds prior to planting. Roundup Ready soybeans are grown most often now. Pre-emergence herbicides can be applied immediately after planting and before the crop emerges. Stand counts should be conducted to determine the quality of the stand. 

  • Tennis teams battle it out in 5th Region tournament

    The first day of the 5th Region tennis tournament brought local teams some wins and some losses, but more importantly, uninterrupted play despite rain showers earlier Friday.
    First-round play in the girls’ draws from the Elizabethtown Community and Technical College courts saw LaRue County advance three of four entrants into Monday’s second round, including both doubles squads.
    No. 7 seed Paige Nalley of LaRue County upset Hannah Rogers, Bethlehem Banshee’s No. 2 singles player, 6-2, 6-0.

  • Hawks, Lady Hawks place in top ten at track conference

    The LaRue County High School Hawks and Lady Hawks each placed ninth at the Lincoln Trail Heartland Conference meet May 10 at LCHS.
    “It may not look good in the standings due to the serious competition from North, John, Bardstown and E’town, but we actually did very well,” said LaRue Coach Jeremy Blair. “We set 21 season best performances –  which is encouraging for this point in the season.”

  • First Baptist Hodgenville celebrates 130 years of service

    First Baptist Church Hodgenville celebrated its 130th anniversary Sunday morning.

  • County deals with flooding on Walter Reed Road

    While most of the county’s floodwaters have receded during the last two weeks, an area on Walter Reed Road continues to be a problem.
    Water up to six-feet-deep has covered the roadway, less than a mile from the intersection with Old E’town Road.
    Clyde Veirs, county road supervisor, described it as a “basin” area that doesn’t go down as fast as stream water to LaRue Fiscal Court last week.

  • Lincoln statue returned for repair

    The Boy Lincoln Statue, damaged when it was struck by a car April 10, has returned to its California birthplace for repairs.
    The sculpture, which depicts Abraham Lincoln at age 7 standing with his dog Honey, was dedicated in May 2008 as part of the Lincoln Bicentennial Celebration. It was knocked from its base by a 2001 Ford Taurus that entered the Lincoln Square traffic island during early morning hours.

  • School impact on flood

    Record rain created flooding issues at McDowell Lakeview Cabins and Junior Bloyd’s storage units but one business owner thinks Abraham Lincoln Elementary School contributed to his issues.
    Owner of the cabins, Gary McDowell, explained his theory Monday night to the LaRue County School Board.

  • Morris withdraws claim against nursing home

    County Attorney Dale Morris’ withdrew a small claims complaint against the Board of Directors of Sunrise Manor Nursing Home after testimony May 5.
    Morris claimed the board refused to pay his legal fees after he represented the nursing home in a 2009 civil suit in LaRue Circuit Court. The suit was a payment dispute between the nursing home and a patient’s estate.
    Morris said his legal fee was $1,500 and had been approved for payment by Administrator Daphne Loyall prior to the board signing a management agreement with Signature Healthcare.

  • Relay for Life brings in $40,000

    Thanks to the dedication and support of the committees, sponsors, teams and community, donations total about $40,000. Some Relay teams have events planned over the summer and donations are still coming in. Any donation received before Aug. 31 will go toward this year’s team totals. The top five fundraising teams are Buffalo Baptist Church, $8,706; Abe’s Railsplitters, $7,229.49; Hawks For Hope, $6,364.19; Janet’s Angels, $4,103.48; and Nationwide Circle of Friends, $1,926.35. For more photos, see 4A.

  • City moves Red Hill Cemetery funds

    The City of Hodgenville has filed civil action in LaRue Circuit Court asking for permission to terminate the Red Hill Cemetery Perpetual Care Fund.

    Prior to 2008, a local government that owned a cemetery was required to create and maintain a perpetual care trust fund for the cemetery’s upkeep. The law was amended by the Kentucky General Assembly to permit the dissolution of a perpetual care fund on condition that the funds were to be utilized solely for the general care, maintenance and embellishment of the cemetery.