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Today's News

  • MOUNT SHERMAN; Going home to Dog Gallus

    At the turn of the century, an area near Mount Sherman became known as “dog gallus” or “dog gallows.”

    The story, as told by Gary Gardner, goes .... a group of young men had imbibed some “liquid corn refreshment,” near the Old Sherman Cemetery. Their entertainment for the evening was to shut up for good an old howling hound dog by hanging it from one of the boys’s pair of galluses or suspenders. The name stuck and for many years, residents of the area would say, “I’m going home to Dog Gallus.”
     

  • MOUNT SHERMAN; 'It's glory is all moonshine'

    Local historians believe Mount Sherman was named after Major General William Tecumseh Sherman, one of the Union’s military leaders during the Civil War.

    No one seems to be certain, however, just why the small town opted to recognize one of the most notorious generals of the war.

    Sherman was promoted to brigadier general after the Battle of First Manassas and sent to Kentucky. President Abraham Lincoln thought Sherman could keep the state from seceding. Sherman made a statement that the war would not end quickly and was replaced by Don Carlos Buell.

  • MOUNT SHERMAN; Did you ever shop at Clyde's?

    During the 1950s to 1970s, a small dry goods store in Mount Sherman provided LaRue and surrounding counties with boots and blue jeans. “Benningfield’s” or better known as “Clyde’s” – named after proprietor Clyde Benningfield – sold the first Levi’s in the area.

  • Skyler Hornback sets Jeopardy record

    “Go big or go home.”

    A gutsy wager helped Skyler Hornback, a 12-year-old student at LaRue County Middle School, break a “Jeopardy!” Kids Week record. He won $66,600 on the popular TV quiz show – the highest one-day total in Kids Week history and the third-highest one-day total in the show’s history.

  • Country artist J.D. Shelburne to perform at Saturday's AGstravaganza

    Country artist J.D. Shelburne said he’s a farm boy at heart.

    He learned the meaning of hard work as he grew up on a tobacco farm in Taylorsville. The work ethic he learned from his father and grandfather “molded him” into the man he is today.

    Playing sports – something he excelled at – was easy compared to housing tobacco.

    “It’s the hardest work there is,” he said.

  • Pipeline opponents organize, offer advice to landowners

    If LaRue Countians do not want a pipeline carrying toxic natural gas liquids crossing their properties, they should prepare to fight – on their own.

    “Don’t rely on local government – cities and counties have virtually no power (to stop the pipeline),” said LaRue County Judge/executive Tommy Turner. If you don’t want it, you’ll have to be the ones to do the legwork … don’t think there is anyone who can step in for you.”

  • Sunrise residents show artwork online

    Residents at Sunrise Manor have brought out their artistic sides, creating pieces that are on display for public viewing in the facility’s first-ever art gallery.

    “In a nursing home facility residents often feel like there are things that they can’t do and that’s what we are trying to get away from as a company. We want to be able to help residents do what they want to do – to help them understand that there’s a lot of life still yet to live,” said Sally Rineker, Quality of Life director at Sunrise Manor.

  • Library summer reading winners

    Winners of the Adult Summer Reading Drawing at the LaRue County Public Library were Gloria Mitchell, Crystal Jackson (not pictured), Wilma McDowell and Cindy Hall (grand prize). For more information on library programs, visit www.laruelibrary.org or on Facebook.

  • Senior Activities -August 7, 2013

    Kentucky Public Retirees to meet
    Kentucky Public Retirees, Lincoln Trail Chapter, will meet 11:30 a.m. Aug. 12 at Ryan’s Family Steak House, 1034 Executive Drive, Elizabethtown. Stephanie Heller from Humana Insurance Company will be the guest speaker.

    Senior Citizens music

  • Special session begins Aug. 19

    Lawmakers will return to Frankfort Aug. 19 for what legislative leaders and the governor for a five-day special session to pass new legislative and judicial district maps.

    Gov. Steve Beshear said the maps will be drawn using the same 2010 U.S. Census data that lawmakers used to craft new congressional maps in 2012. That will include counting the more than 8,400 federal prisoners. That had been in question after House leaders proposed a map this spring that didn’t count those prisoners.