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Today's News

  • MAXINE; Oak Hill Baptist Church predates Civil War

    Oak Hill Baptist Church rests in a bend on Oak Hill Road, surrounded by oak trees –which is how the church received its name.

    A little more than 157 years ago, on April 30, 1856, 35 former members of Three Forks Bacon Creek Baptist Church signed a petition to separate to form Oak Hill Baptist Church.

  • MAXINE; McCubbin’s memories of Maxine

    Nancy McCubbin, once a Pennington, grew up in Maxine and watched as the small community changed over the years.

    “It was quite different from today,” said McCubbin.

    “I remember Maxine – Maggard’s store. It was there for years and was more of a general store. They sold a small amount of things that you could get at Wal-Mart today.”

    McCubbin said she grew up living next to the store on Oak Hill Road.

  • MAXINE: Maxine store was a local business hub

    Maxine’s name, although a mystery, was thought to have received its name from the Maxine Store, the long-standing main establishment in the quaint community.

    The store was first opened by Albert and Millie Hazle in the late 1800s, and was then sold to Mattie and Harvey Ward, who ran the store for several years.

    John Edward “Ed” and Halcye Wheeler ran the store from the 1920s to the 1960s.  

  • Avery to speak at ECTC

     Environmental social activist and Kentucky resident Sam Avery is coming to Elizabethtown Community and Technical College to discuss his recent book on the controversial Keystone XL natural gas pipeline, The Pipeline and the Paradigm.

    A former instructor at ECTC as well as a certified solar installer and trainer in nonviolent resistance techniques, Avery will discuss the need for “a new, larger worldview (or paradigm)” that puts economic necessities within a larger frame that includes preserving the environment.

  • ECTC hosts "Evening with the Stars"

     Elizabethtown Community and Technical College is hosting “An Evening with the Stars” on Oct. 7 – the second in its STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) series of initiatives.  The first event was a visit from former astronaut Story Musgrave.

    The program will give participants the opportunity to learn about celestial bodies like stars, planets and meteors, and to view them through telescopes provided by the college.  The informational session and viewing will be conducted by ECTC science faculty. 

  • MAXINE; Maxine’s name still a mystery

    Maxine, a small community located in LaRue County close to the Hart County Line, was once considered to be a sub section or hamlet of Hammonville.

    Hammonville also spelled as Hammonsville or Hammondville is 3.5 miles south of Maxine, in Hart County.

    According to the Geographic Names Information System Maxine is considered to be an unincorporated, populated place located in LaRue County with a geographic pinpoint location of latitude 37.465 and longitude -85.796. It’s at 253 feet above sea level.

  • Student prayer
  • Community Calendar - October 2, 2013

    Legislative meet and greet
    The LaRue County Public Library will host a legislative meet and greet 1-2 p.m. Oct. 3. Light refreshments will be served.

    Lincoln Days quilt show
    Lincoln Days quilt entries will be taken at Hodgenville Christian Church on Oct. 4. Volunteers are needed to sit with the quilt display on Oct. 5-6. For more information, call Beverly Heath at 358-4820.

  • Board of Health prepares for change

    The LaRue County Board of Health convened Sept. 10 to discuss the budget that was approved July 23.

    Judge/executive Tommy Turner presented the financial statement for 2013-14.

    The budget allotted $196,175 in total revenue with $182,690 in estimated expenses, leaving $13,485 to be set aside for future endeavors. In addition, $12,000 carried over from the previous fiscal year budget into the new year’s budget.

    The BOH has two reserve accounts in CD funds totaling more than $60,000.

  • Kentucky Colonel