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Today's News

  • BackPack program takes strides to beat hunger

     

    According to the 2010 Hunger Study, one in every four Kentucky children is living in poverty. Feeding America, Kentucky's Heartland is making huge strides in providing food to at-risk children in Central and south central Kentucky through its BackPack Program.

  • Better Business Bureau offers several tips for summer

    1. Fake Sweepstakes – Local consumers have been receiving calls from legitimate-sounding sweepstakes companies that are actually scams. At times, the caller will use a real name and act as an “official” for Reader’s Digest or Publishers Clearing House. Some victims will receive a second call from someone acting as a U.S. Customs Official at an airport that has a letter regarding the sweepstakes win and will release it for a hefty fee.

  • August marks World Breastfeeding Month

    In honor of World Breastfeeding Month, the Kentucky Department for Public Health stresses the importance of providing support for breastfeeding families.

    According to DPH, mothers have more success breastfeeding their babies when they have adequate support from healthcare providers, family, friends and their community. The slogan “Breastfeeding Support: Stay Connected” focuses on the importance of the connection between mother and baby, as well as the importance of having support.

  • Rep. Meredith donates $700 to LaRue County Schools

    State Rep. Michael Meredith made a personal donation of $700 to the LaRue County Schools Family Resources/Youth Services Centers. This donation will be used to purchase school supplies for students in need of help. From left, Melissa Pearman, Hodgenville Elementary School Family Resource Center coordinator; Sarah Hornback, director of Family Services; Meredith; Superintendent Sam Sanders; Marsha Duncan, LaRue County Schools Youth Service Center coordinator; and Machelle Durham, Abraham Lincoln Elementary School Family Resource Center coordinator. 

  • Page of Lincoln's early writing on display

    The oldest known sample of Abraham Lincoln’s writing will be on display during August at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum in Springfield, Ill., according to Myjournalcourier.com

    It's a page from teenage Lincoln's sum book, a homemade booklet of scratch paper Lincoln used to practice math.

    Lincoln's stepmother, Sarah Bush Johnston Lincoln, saved the book for 35 years. After the president's death, she gave it to his law partner, who gave away pages to Lincoln's friends. Ten pages still exist.

  • TOUCHPOINTS: Jealousy creates conflict between families, friends

    Conflict usually begins when we don’t get what we want. It almost always begins with selfish motives.

    Absalom wanted to be king. The only way he could do that was to take the kingdom away from his father, David (II Samuel 15:1-12). 

    You know you are in conflict when you are daydreaming for something you want – a thing, a position or a viewpoint – and it is always connected to feelings of deep-seated hatred, or being in disagreement with someone in order to point out differences, especially when compared.

  • Mount Sherman post office could close

    Those who get their mail at Mount Sherman Post Office could soon have a change of address.

    The post office is one of about 3,700 being studied for possible closure by the U.S. Postal Service. More than 130 of the locations are in Kentucky.

    Last week, USPS announced in a press release that because more and more customers are conducting postal business online, on smart phones and at other retail stores, the need for post office locations, which is the largest retail network in the country, is declining.

  • Natalie Hope Farrar wins essay contest

    A LaRue County High School sophomore is among four high school students to earn scholarship dollars through the Secretary of State’s office.

    Natalie Hope Farrar’s winning essay addressed the rise in the number of voters who were registered as independents as compared to numbers of independents elected to office and how those numbers may be influenced by scant of media coverage.  

  • Former teacher pleads guilty to unlawful transaction with minor

    Jeremy Todd Blair, a former LaRue County High School teacher and coach, pleaded guilty Wednesday to one count of third-degree unlawful transaction with a minor.

    Blair, 33, was charged with the Class A misdemeanor after being “told to stay away” from a 16-year-old girl, a LCHS student, by her parents earlier this year, according to Deputy Eric Williamson.

  • Traditional lightbulbs on the way out

    Federal regulations will soon change the way residents light up a room.

    Beginning next Jan. 1, the new regulations will prohibit the sale of standard 100-watt incandescent light bulbs.

    On Jan. 1, 2013, the traditional 75-watt bulb will no longer be available, and on Jan. 1, 2014, the traditional 60- and 45-watt bulbs will no longer be sold. California began the transition this year.