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Today's News

  • WHITE CITY; White City was a grocery capital

    In its heyday, White City was the home of several stores and was once considered to be a main stop on the way between Hodgenville and other towns such as Elizabethtown or New Haven.

    According to Richard Taylor, a former long-time resident of White City, there were once four stores and a supermarket located in the area.

    The first store to come to town was Anderson’s, run by William “Bill” Anderson, the same Anderson that was visited by Mr. Morrison, credited with coming up with the hamlet’s name.

  • HOWARDSTOWN; F.M. Head grocery photos
  • WHITE CITY; St. Joachim or Mulhall Chapel Cemetery still in use

    Saint Joachim Catholic Church Cemetery, one of the oldest cemeteries in LaRue County, is about a mile east of White City on Howardstown Road.

    The church was established about 1850 by Father Thomas A. Mulhall Sr., the son of Thomas Kempis Mulhall Sr., who emigrated from Ireland in the early 1800’s.

    Thomas A. Mulhall Sr. built a log cabin church in the White City area that was not far from where the cemetery is located.

    The church was once referred to as Mulhall Chapel. It burned a couple of decades later.  

  • WHITE CITY: Baby Lincoln’s gravemarker uncovered in 1933

    Despite his many family ties in Kentucky, Thomas Lincoln was a wanderer. First settling in Elizabethtown with his new bride, he became restless and moved to the Sinking Spring Farm in LaRue County. In 1809, he bought land on Knob Creek, only a few miles east of Sinking Spring.

    After a land dispute in 1816, he again packed up and set off for Indiana with wife Nancy, daughter Sarah, and son Abraham, leaving behind only two small cabins which quickly fell to ruin.

  • WHITE CITY; Nancy Raine recalls businesses, neighbors

    Nancy Belle Raine moved to White City with her husband Roy, on Feb. 7, 1953.

    Raine said there are many things she remembers about the small community that reflect its rich past.

    The old location of Pleasant Grove Baptist Church, a long-standing congregation of White City, was said to have served as a hospital during the Civil War.

    Roy Raines’ brother, Walter, served as the caretaker of Pleasant Grove cemetery for a number of years, and mentioned the tale of the church converting to a temporary hospital for wounded soldiers.

  • WHITE CITY; West School: An echo of the past

    A one-room schoolhouse with the original chalkboard still inside, sits off to the side of a yard on Raine Road.

    Bright green leaves from nearby trees and long shoots of grass have grown up around the bare boards, that were once painted a crisp white.

    Odds and ends fill the inside where student chairs and desks once sat.
    A single light bulb hangs down from the darkened paneled ceiling –the only internal addition.

  • WHITE CITY; Pleasant Grove’s history predates Civil War

    Pleasant Grove Baptist Church was established 161 years ago on Sept. 11, 1852, nine years before the start of the Civil War.

    In the church history it is recorded that a group of believers met in the middle of a cluster of sycamore trees, which is how the church got its name.

    The original church building was built of logs in 1853, but was replaced with a new building dedicated on May 5, 1897.

  • WHITE CITY; What’s in a name?

    The small community of White City is about five miles outside of Hodgenville on Bardstown Road. It was established sometime in the 1800’s as an unincorporated community.

    It was registered in the U.S. Department of the Interior’s geographical database on Sept. 20, 1979.

    According to Robert M. Rennick, author of Kentucky Place Names, White City was given its name from a man who visited the area.

  • Iron Horse Festival 2013
  • Honoring a fallen officer and friend

    Hodgenville Police Department held a candlelight service Monday to honor Officer Mark Taulbee who died Sept. 16, 2012.

    Taulbee lost control of his cruiser while in pursuit of a subject. He died of injuries sustained in the crash.

    Supporting Heroes helped to organize the service on Lincoln Square.