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Today's News

  • There's always room for the Farm page

    A few months ago, I was invited to become an at-large board member of the Kentucky Press Association. I’ve learned a lot at the few meetings I’ve attended – which is always a good thing.

    On a couple of occasions, I’ve felt very out of place. There are several representatives from the state’s largest dailies on that board – and their experiences and outlooks are different from mine.

  • Bradley graduates

    Deena Bradley, senior vice president of Magnolia Bank in Hodgenville, was among 190 bankers receiving graduation diplomas from the Graduate School of Banking at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge.

    The three-year program provides courses covering all aspects of banking, economics and related subjects. Students traveled from 20 states and Mexico to participate in the session.

    Bradley received 180 hours of classroom instruction and 30 hours of reviews during the course.

  • Magnolia Bank earns 5-star rating

    Magnolia Bank has been recognized as one of the strongest banks in the nation, based on June 30, 2014, financial data.

    The bank has earned BauerFinancial’s highest 5-Star rating for strength and stability.

    To earn Bauer’s 5-Star Superior rating, a bank must excel in areas of capital adequacy, delinquent loan levels and profitability. 

  • Scholar: Whelan honored by TIP

    Jonathan Whelan, the home-schooled seventh-grade son of David and Beverly Whelan of Howardstown, was recognized in Duke TIP’s Kentucky Recognition Ceremony at Western Kentucky University on May 23.

    To be eligible to participate in Duke University’s Talent Identification Program, a student must have scored in the top 5 percent of his grade on a national standardized achievement test. Eligible students are then required to take either the ACT or SAT alongside college-bound 11th and 12th graders.

  • PHOTO: IFAL Conference

     LaRue County High School junior Turner Cottrell recently returned home from Kentucky Farm Bureau’s Institute for Future Agricultural Leaders. He and 45 other high school students from around the state attended the five-day summer leadership conference, held June 22-26 at the University of Kentucky. Cottrell, center, was greeted by Mark Haney, president of Kentucky Farm Bureau, left, and Dr. Larry Grabau, University of Kentucky Associate Dean for Instruction.

  • South Dixie Pharmacy brings a personal touch to Sonora area

    After working 35 years as a pharmacist with national chains, Diana Bowles opened a pharmacy in her hometown of Sonora.

    South Dixie Pharmacy opened in December 2012.

    “This is my hometown, I’ve lived here all my life and I wanted to come here and start something, and thought why not give it a shot,” said Bowles.

    She and her co-owner, Matt Daniels, have a combined 50 years of experience working with Wal-Mart, Rite Aid and Sam’s Club.

  • PHOTO: Ag interests

     Members of the 2014 Kentucky General Assembly Interim Joint Committee on Agriculture met with the members of the  Kentucky Soybean Association and the Kentucky Soybean Board last week at Ryan and Misty Bivens’ Fresh Start Farms in Hodgenville.

  • Local Church pantries feeding families

    LaRue County is home to nearly 70 churches. To many people, churches are a place to meet people, help people, and find help.

    Though some focus on helping the world in a more broad sense, many of these churches make it their mission to reach out to those in need locally. Programs like food pantries and other outreach ministries are popping up everywhere, and not just in large churches, but small ones too.

  • Tips for a field (or jar) full of fireflies

    Remember how much fun it was (or is) to chase fireflies when you were young? Once you caught a firefly, you would hold it in your hand to watch the flickering light for a few moments and then release it unharmed to fly away. You might also (as I did) make a firefly lantern with fireflies in a glass jar (holes punched in the lid of course).

  • Garden of Peruvian Predicaments

    The Peruvian purple corn looks awfully good right now and might actually produce an ear or two in the near future.

    I find myself in a predicament, though: How do I harvest these Peruvian treasures before the varmints do?

    The hubbub around the Groundhog Hill hood is that a band of raccoons are touring the nearby farms and attacking unsuspecting and unprotected patches of sweet corn. One fellow farmer let loose his own pack of dogs, but they failed to keep the critters from their target.

    My brother Philip has one word of advice: Fence.