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Today's News

  • Confederate flag and memorabilia will remain in Lincoln Museum

    Amidst the debate about the removal of Confederate flags and other Confederate memorabilia in museums and public places across the nation, the Lincoln Museum in downtown Hodgenville will keep their Confederate memorabilia.

    Lincoln Museum owner Iris LaRue said the museum’s job is to provide visitors with “a look at Abraham Lincoln’s life.” She said it’s their job to tell the history of Lincoln and the significant points of his life, including the Civil War and the war with the Confederate States of America.

  • Flood cleanup continues

    Several Hodgenville business owners and homeowners are continuing to cleanup after a recent flood on July 3 brought more than five inches of rain within three hours.

    Paula LaRue Varney, owner of Paula’s Hot Biscuit, said the flood has caused her restaurant to be closed until further notice. She said her supplies and appliances were saved from any flood damage but that the interior walls and insulation will have to be replaced.

  • Fast and furious flooding

    Hodgenville Mayor Kenny Devore declared a state of emergency after the city received more than five inches of rain within a three-hour period last Friday, July 3.

    According to the National Weather Service, Hodgenville received more than five inches of rain last Friday, with more than six inches of rain reported within a two-mile radius of downtown.

  • Smith is new Upton mayor

    The City of Upton has a new mayor after the recent resignation of former mayor Chris Hines.

    The Upton Council voted unanimously to appoint Councilmember Melissa “Missey” Smith as mayor during their monthly meeting on June 16. Smith filled the vacancy left by Hines, who resigned as mayor on May 19, after moving outside of the city limits.

    As a result of Smith being appointed mayor, her council seat is now vacant.

  • Walking Lincoln’s path

    Josh Kimble likes Abraham Lincoln. He is so impressed with the 16th president of the United States, he is walking from Hodgenville to Springfield, Ill., to honor him.

    Josh, 17, of Radcliff, started out Wednesday, July 1, from the Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historical Park on the first few miles of the journey.

    “I like Lincoln,” he said of the president. “And Mary Todd.”

    Josh, who has Down Syndrome, plans to complete the journey to raise awareness of people with many kinds of disabilities.

  • Beshear visits LaRue, talks to Hodgenville Rotary

    Andy Beshear, the Democratic candidate Kentucky’s Attorney General, told the Hodgenville Rotary Club meeting last week that if elected, he would fight for the safety and wellbeing of all Kentuckians.

    Beshear spoke at the meeting as a part of his statewide campaign for attorney general. Beshear was unopposed in the May primary and will face Republican Whitney Westerfield in November’s general election.

  • Judge to review Sanders’ appeal

    A review of submissions regarding the appeal of Samuel D. Sanders conviction on two charges was held in LaRue County Circuit Court on Monday.

    Judge Charles C. Simms, III continued the appeal process, acknowledging a statement of appeal and statement of facts filed by attorneys for Samuel D. Sanders.

    Sanders entered an Alford Plea in May for operating a motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol or drugs and speeding 15 miles per hour over the limit. He was arrested March 29, 2014.

  • Rising waters flood parts of Hodgenville
  • Conway signs letter urging strong data security law

    On Tuesday, Attorney General Jack Conway joined a bipartisan effort to ensure that any future federal data breach notification or data security law is effective and provides consumers with the best protection. Conway and 46 other state attorneys general sent a multistate letter to members of the U.S. Congress emphasizing the importance of maintaining states’ authority to enforce data breach and data security laws, and their ability to enact laws to address future data security risks.

  • Two plead guilty to trafficking charges

    By BOBBIE LANHAM

    Co-defendants Amy Nicole Loyall and Cassidy Merrick Loyall both pleaded guilty to several charges June 30 in LaRue County Circuit Court.

    Amy N. Loyall (1986) of New Haven was sentenced to one year, diverted, for first degree trafficking in a controlled substance, Adderall, a drug used to treat attention deficit disorders and narcolepsy. Thirteen other charges were dismissed.