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Today's News

  • While your power is out...

    What to do about your food if the power goes out

    Info provided by LaRue County Environmental Services

    •    Do not open the refrigerator or freezer.  An unopened refrigerator will keep foods safely cold for about 4 hours.  A full freezer will hold the temperature for approximately 48 hours, 24 hours if it is half full.  If it looks like the power outage will be for more than 2-4 hours, pack refrigerated food items such as milk, dairy products, meats, eggs, and left-overs into a cooler surrounded by ice.

  • Main Street selects interim director

    Celia Creal McDonald was hired as interim Main Street manager last week by the Main Street executive board.

    McDonald, former publisher and editor of The LaRue County Herald News, will work with the committee until May 1 or until a permanent replacement can be hired.

  • Yard sale, soup supper benefit softball team

    Two benefits for the Lady Hawks softball team are set for Feb. 14.

    The team will have a yard sale 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Feb. 14 in the LCMS cafeteria. Beginning at noon, you can purchase a 22-gallon bag for $5 and fill it with as many items as possible.

    For more information, call Melissa Enlow at 763-3517.

  • Four-car crash injures three

    Three people were injured in a four-car crash at the intersection of Lincoln Parkway and Lincoln Farm Road Saturday afternoon.

    About 5 p.m., a 2006 Pontiac G-6 driven by Ryan Puckett, 34, of Hodgenville, was traveling south on Lincoln Farm Road, according to Hodgenville City Police. Puckett’s car skidded through the intersection into the path of a 2005 GM 1500 pickup driven by Melany Cundiff, 40, of Campbellsville.

    Puckett’s car then struck a 2003 Pontiac Sunfire, sitting at the traffic light and driven by Kristie Hatfield, 17, of Magnolia.

  • New penny unveiled in honor of Lincoln’s 200th birthday

    The 200th observance of the birth of Hodgenville’s famous native son will be celebrated Feb. 12.

    Abraham Lincoln was born on that day in 1809 in a log cabin on Sinking Spring Farm. The barefoot frontier boy grew up to become our 16th president – a man who became known as the “savior of the union” during a time of turmoil.

  • New penny unveiled in honor of Lincoln's 200th birthday

    The 200th observance of the birth of Hodgenville’s famous native son will be celebrated Feb. 12.

    Abraham Lincoln was born on that day in 1809 in a log cabin on Sinking Spring Farm. The barefoot frontier boy grew up to become our 16th president – a man who became known as the “savior of the union” during a time of turmoil.

  • Birthday party raises funds for childhood cancer research

    Elyssa Hawkins will celebrate her eighth birthday 3-5 p.m. Feb. 7 at the Hodgenville Elementary School gym with a fundraiser for Alex’s Lemonade Stand, a charity that promotes childhood cancer research. The event was rescheduled because of last week's ice storm.

    Family-friendly games include putt-putt golf, foam darts and ring toss. Snacks are also available.

    Magician Dinky Gowen will present a 30-minute illusion show at 4 p.m. Escape artist Jennifer Wheat will also perform.

  • LINCOLNee^BICENTENNIALee^EVENTS

    FEB. 11

    One Man’s Lincoln

    The play “One Man’s Lincoln” will be presented at the LaRue County High School Performing Arts Center at 7:30 p.m. There is no charge for tickets to the two-hour play. Tickets are required, however. The Lincoln Museum will host a dinner prior to the play at 6:30 p.m. For tickets or more information, call the museum at 358-3163 or e-mail abe@lincolnmuseum-ky.org.

    FEB. 12

    Opening ceremony on Lincoln Square

  • Doctor leaving Hodgenville practice

    When Dr. Khue Tran leaves his Hodgenville medical practice Jan. 30, he hopes to find a little more time for himself and family outside the office.

    After being accustomed to 12- to 16-hour workdays year after year, the 60-year-old physician who lives in Elizabethtown, feels the time has come to reduce his workload.

    “When I was younger, I could be awakened in the middle of the night and be able to go right back to sleep, but each year that gets a little harder,” he said. He intends to carry a slimmer schedule while practicing at Fort Knox.

  • Power outage sends dozens to shelter

    As power outages spread across LaRue County last week, residents began searching for alternative heat sources.

    Some stood in lines at stores, waiting to fill containers with kerosene for portable heaters. Others purchased firewood or propane heaters. Others drove several hours to neighboring states in hopes of finding a heater.

    Some moved in with friends or relatives. And when all else failed, they sought refuge from the American Red Cross.