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Today's News

  • Discovery of headstone may cause revisionist Lincoln history

    DECATUR – A recently uncovered headstone at Greenwood Cemetery in Decatur could rewrite part of the family history of Illinois' most famous figure.

    That headstone belongs to Mary Hanks, who was the second cousin of Abraham Lincoln. While history books say she was born in 1824 and was buried in 1843, the headstone suggests she was instead buried in 1813, which would make her the oldest recorded burial in Decatur and perhaps the oldest in the entire state of Illinois.

  • Arts historian chronicles life, work of Nelson silversmith

    Less is known about Bardstown silversmith and clockmaker Jonathan Simpson than about his work, but Gary Dean Gardner wants to change that.

    The independent scholar of southern history and decorative arts is working with local historians Francis X. Smith Sr., Dixie Hibbs, Bjoern Lorenzen, David Hall and others on a survey of the work of the nationally renowned 19th century craftsman.

    He is also writing a comprehensive biography of Simpson.

  • Things that make you wonder

        What if only one person from every county in Kentucky decided to go vote after all on election day? Would we be facing a recanvass this Thursday? The Republican Gubernatorial race was won unofficially by 83 votes, and there are 120 counties in Kentucky. I wonder....

  • Upcoming home canning classes

    When thinking about home canning, safety is of utmost importance. Bacteria, molds and yeast can grow quickly on fresh foods, and fruits and vegetables contain oxygen and enzymes that can cause food to spoil. Safe home canning methods help prevent the growth of these bacteria, yeast and molds in addition to removing excess oxygen from the food, which destroys spoilage enzymes and helps form strong vacuum seals on the jars.

  • Farmers hoping for resurgence of local farming by reinstating hemp

    rmers – Shelby Floyd from Upton and Matt Smith from Roanoke – are hoping for a resurgence of a strong local farming economy by area farmers reinstating hemp – a crop that hasn’t been grown here commercially for more than 60 years.

    Smith and Floyd, both 2011 LaRue County High School graduates, traveled to Colorado April 4 to the Northern Colorado Hemp Expo to learn more about the producing the plant commercially. They found that hemp is relatively easy to grow and quite versatile as it can be made into 25,000 products.

  • Relay team proves pigs really can fly… Well Almost!

    When LaRue County’s Living Strong Relay for Life team was brainstorming new ideas for fundraisers, little did they realize that a leftover box from the American Cancer Society of plastic purple pigs would end up being one of their biggest money makers for the May Relay.

  • Armes’ appeal succeeds

    A DUI case is being returned to LaRue District Court after acircuit court judge reversed a
    district judge’s decision regarding a motion to suppress evidence.
    According to court documents,Rodney Armes is facing a DUI charge after an Oct. 3,
    2013, arrest.
    Armes, a former LaRue County High School assistant principal and head football
    coach, entered a “conditional plea of guilty pending circuit court appeal” and the case was
    disposed of in district court in August 2014.

  • FREE FOR ALL

    A program that provides free breakfast and lunch to students will expand to all LaRue County Schools in the 2015-16 school year, helping to ensure students are ready to learn
    and cutting paperwork for parents.
    At its May 12 special meeting, the LaRue County Schools Board of Education unanimously approved free breakfast and lunch for every middle and high school student.
    Free breakfast and lunch already is provided at the district’s elementary
    schools.

  • Lincoln Parkway Fatality
  • PHOTO: Sportsmanship Award