.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • ECTC provides a sense of direction

    Landmark News Service

    With classes back in session this week, Elizabethtown Community and Technical College is helping students maneuver around construction on campus.

    ECTC set up tents in two locations to help new students navigate around construction of the Phase II building of the Regional Postsecondary Education Center. The tents are between the Administration Building and the Science Building and in front of the Occupational/Technical Building.

  • KY 222 improvements still in works after NAATBatt flops

    Hopes of establishing a lithium-ion battery research center and production facility in Glendale were derailed last week when federal development dollars went elsewhere.

    A consortium of companies – known as the National Alliance for Advanced Transportation Batteries or NAATBatt –  applied for a $342 million federal stimulus grant to build a 1 million-square-foot plant to manufacture four different formats of lithium-ion battery cells. Several hundred new jobs were expected to be created in the field of electrical car power.

  • Women's pen pal friendship spans six decades and worth every stamp

    If Tickle Ragland doesn’t hold a record for length of corresponding with a pen pal, she surely must be close.

    Ragland, 72, has exchanged letters with Sharon Meisenheimer of Walnut, Ill., for 62 years.

    In those six decades, they have seen the price of stamps increase from 3 to 44 cents, but much more importantly, the two women have developed a closeness that rivals that of siblings.

  • Fraze to present summer research at National Consortium

    The Carol Martin Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science in Kentucky at Western Kentucky University has been named to Newsweek’s 2009 list of  “The Public Elites.”

  • Make mealtime a family time

    One of the fondest memories of my childhood is that of my entire family sitting down almost every evening for a nice meal together. It was a great opportunity for us to talk about the day’s events and stay connected with each other. For most families these days it is hard to make time for family meals for many reasons. But the benefits of sharing a meal together are tremendous for both parents and kids.

  • Mather family honored for competing in state games

    A month after Donald and Lahoma Mather celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary, the two went their separate ways.

    Lahoma had knee replacement surgery and was homebound as she recovered. Days afterward - and just after his 80th birthday, Donald went to Lexington to compete in the Bluegrass State Games. Their large extended family banded together and decided that some would stay at home and care for Lahoma while the others would travel to Lexington to support Donald.

  • Worrying is a waste of time

    “Don’t worry about anything.” Philippians 4:6

    Forty percent of what we worry about never happens. Thirty percent already has happened. Twelve percent focuses on opinions or situations we can’t change. Ten percent on our health, which only worsens it. Eight percent concerns real problems we can’t influence. Think – 92 percent of our worries are needless.

    Worry comes from a Greek word meaning “to divide the mind.” Anxiety splits us right down the middle.

  • America’s foundation was built on the word of God

    If anything is to last it must have a good foundation, be it a building, organization, marriage or whatever. I submit to you that America was founded upon such a firm foundation influenced by Christianity and it will continue so long as it does not seek other building stones.

    There is evidence today that some of our foundation stones of the past are crumbling because of inattention. Students of history see a parallel between the late and great Roman Empire and the America of today. Some would say that America is following in Rome’s footsteps.

  • WKU forensic camp offers instruction to students

    Seventy-five students from Kentucky and nine other states attended the Summer Forensic Camp July 12-17 at Western Kentucky University.

    The weeklong camp, hosted by WKU’s award-winning forensic program, provides speech and debate instruction for junior high and high school students. Instructors include college and high school coaches as well as members of the WKU forensic team.

    Participants included:

  • Federal indictment names Buffalo man in drug charges

    A federal grand jury in Louisville returned an indictment against Mickey S. Tedder, 56, of Buffalo for possessing and distributing methamphetamine powder, according to Acting United States Attorney Candace G. Hill of the Western District of Kentucky.

    The indictment alleges that on four occasions between April 14 and May 12, Tedder possessed with the intent to distribute and distributed various quantities of methamphetamine in LaRue and Hardin counties. The street value of the methamphetamine is about $9,400.