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Today's News

  • Superintendent charged with DUI, speeding

    Hodgenville police arrested LaRue County Schools Superintendent Sam Sanders on a charge of driving under the influence of alcohol shortly after midnight Saturday.

    Sanders, who also was charged with speeding, was driving a school-owned car, according to Hodgenville Police Chief Steve Johnson. The arrest occurred about 40 minutes after midnight Saturday.

    Bardstown attorney Doug Hubbard spoke on behalf of Sanders, saying he was asked to represent the superintendent.

    “Our families go back a long way,” Hubbard said.

  • Sunrise Volunteers form duet

    Sunrise Volunteers

    Two more volunteers are making their voices heard – literally. They have started singing as a duet at 2 p.m. on Mondays in the second floor dining hall. They will sing at least one-half hour each session.

    These two dedicated volunteers – Sybil Skaggs and Susie Milby – are also starting something else that is new: singing in residents’ rooms on a one-on-one basis. Many residents love the visitation and the demand on these ladies’ time is great.

  • Superintendent charged with DUI, speeding

    LaRue County Schools Superintendent Sam Sanders was charged early Saturday with driving under the influence by Hodgenville City Police.

    Police Chief Steve Johnson said Sanders was driving a car registered to LaRue County Board of Education. He allegedly pulled out in front of another vehicle on Water Street. Johnson said he speeded up when a city officer's cruiser fell in behind him.

    Chief Johnson said Sanders was taken to LaRue County Detention Center and released shortly after he was brought there.

  • Hardin Fiscal Court raises animal adoption fees

    Hardin Fiscal Court created a change fund for Animal Control, raised adoption fees Tuesday and set new fees for the animal shelter on Peterson Drive in Elizabethtown.

    The fund would be used to provide change for customers who adopt animals, said Magistrate Garry King. King said the department never had the fund before, but the new facility has seen a rise in adoptions and less need for euthanizations.

    According to the resolution, the county treasurer will withhold $100 out of a daily deposit from the department to start the fund.

  • PHOTOS: Agriculture Literacy Week
  • National Public Health Week, April 7-13

    What does your local health department do for you?

    Even before the days of plague in Europe and disease epidemics that devastated entire populations, we, as human beings, have searched for ways to make the world a healthier and safer place to live, while at the same time increasing our lifespan. 

  • Claycomb appointed to ECTC Board of Directors

    Governor Steve Beshear has appointed Robert Kenneth Claycomb of Hodgenville to the Elizabethtown Community and Technical College Board of Directors.

    Claycomb, an attorney, replaces John L. Rogers, whose term has expired. He will serve through Sept. 11, 2019.

  • COLUMN: Grief is softened by thought of eternal life

    ….Do not … grieve like the rest of men who have no hope. 1 Thessalonians 4:13

    Several years ago, a dear friend lost her husband unexpectedly. At the funeral home, she asked me to write some articles about grief. I told her I would, but, in truth, I couldn’t write effectively about something I had never truly experienced.

  • COLUMN: Make tractor maintenance a routine

    A regular front to back inspection routine can help extend a tractor’s life. Move from the front to the back identifying key things to check.

    Start with the front axles and steering. Is it time to grease those bearings and steering components?

    Make sure nothing is loose or ready to fall off. Make sure the coolant levels are okay, and the fluid is all right. Make sure the radiator is not plugged up with debris.

  • PHOTO: Mackey directions funds to 4-H

    Hardin County farmer David Mackey directed a $2,500 donation to Hardin County 4-H through America’s Farmers Grow Communities. The donation will help the group provide camp scholarships for low-income youth, and for adults who attend camp as a volunteer. It will also fund volunteer leadership development through trainings and certifications, in order for them to help the youth through their skills and knowledge.