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Today's News

  • New penny unveiled in honor of Lincoln’s 200th birthday

    The 200th observance of the birth of Hodgenville’s famous native son will be celebrated Feb. 12.

    Abraham Lincoln was born on that day in 1809 in a log cabin on Sinking Spring Farm. The barefoot frontier boy grew up to become our 16th president – a man who became known as the “savior of the union” during a time of turmoil.

  • New penny unveiled in honor of Lincoln's 200th birthday

    The 200th observance of the birth of Hodgenville’s famous native son will be celebrated Feb. 12.

    Abraham Lincoln was born on that day in 1809 in a log cabin on Sinking Spring Farm. The barefoot frontier boy grew up to become our 16th president – a man who became known as the “savior of the union” during a time of turmoil.

  • Birthday party raises funds for childhood cancer research

    Elyssa Hawkins will celebrate her eighth birthday 3-5 p.m. Feb. 7 at the Hodgenville Elementary School gym with a fundraiser for Alex’s Lemonade Stand, a charity that promotes childhood cancer research. The event was rescheduled because of last week's ice storm.

    Family-friendly games include putt-putt golf, foam darts and ring toss. Snacks are also available.

    Magician Dinky Gowen will present a 30-minute illusion show at 4 p.m. Escape artist Jennifer Wheat will also perform.

  • LINCOLNee^BICENTENNIALee^EVENTS

    FEB. 11

    One Man’s Lincoln

    The play “One Man’s Lincoln” will be presented at the LaRue County High School Performing Arts Center at 7:30 p.m. There is no charge for tickets to the two-hour play. Tickets are required, however. The Lincoln Museum will host a dinner prior to the play at 6:30 p.m. For tickets or more information, call the museum at 358-3163 or e-mail abe@lincolnmuseum-ky.org.

    FEB. 12

    Opening ceremony on Lincoln Square

  • Doctor leaving Hodgenville practice

    When Dr. Khue Tran leaves his Hodgenville medical practice Jan. 30, he hopes to find a little more time for himself and family outside the office.

    After being accustomed to 12- to 16-hour workdays year after year, the 60-year-old physician who lives in Elizabethtown, feels the time has come to reduce his workload.

    “When I was younger, I could be awakened in the middle of the night and be able to go right back to sleep, but each year that gets a little harder,” he said. He intends to carry a slimmer schedule while practicing at Fort Knox.

  • Power outage sends dozens to shelter

    As power outages spread across LaRue County last week, residents began searching for alternative heat sources.

    Some stood in lines at stores, waiting to fill containers with kerosene for portable heaters. Others purchased firewood or propane heaters. Others drove several hours to neighboring states in hopes of finding a heater.

    Some moved in with friends or relatives. And when all else failed, they sought refuge from the American Red Cross.

  • Project Graduation a fun, safe night to remember

    Wanting to give this year’s graduating LaRue County High School seniors a “fun, safe night to remember,” several of those seniors’ parents have been working since September on this year’s Project Graduation.

    Observed at many high school campuses throughout the nation after Commencement exercises, Project Graduation began more than 20 years ago in the northeast after several students died in alcohol-related auto accidents while celebrating their graduation.

  • Coming in the Herald News

    The print edition of The LaRue County Herald News arrives today with stories about the 200th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln's birth and the ice storm aftermath dominating the paper.

    Here are a few of the top headlines:

    New penny unveiled in honor of Lincoln's 200th birthday

    Warm weekend accelerates cleanup  after ice storm

    350 in county still without power after two weeks

    National Guard supplies water, food through FEMA

    Main Street under fire; group's certification in doubt

  • Get out of the cart before you’re stuck in it

    I saw something downright appalling the other day.

    It was a fat child.

    Before you start penning those letters or firing off e-mails with indignation that I should say such a thing about the poor little fella, let me explain. His weight was the least of his problems.

    My husband Bud and I were in the grocery store and ended up in an aisle behind a woman pushing a shopping cart with her son inside. She was complaining and griping at the boy because he was riding in the cart, that he wouldn’t get out and was eating all the food.

  • Applications accepted for diversification

    Producer applications for the LaRue County Goat and Sheep Association’s Goat and Sheep Diversification Program will be accepted Jan. 5-30. Approved applicants must submit receipts for reimbursement of qualified expenses before Jan. 30. The program’s grant funds are a portion of the Phase 1 Tobacco Program. Applications and further information including guidelines and restrictions may be obtained by contacting program administrators Sherman and Renee Thomason at 358-0187, Gil Myers at 324-4366 or the LaRue County Extension Service office at 358-3401.