.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Cataract treatments improve quality of life

    Cataracts are the leading cause of blindness in the world. Cataracts affect 20.5 million Americans age 40 and older.

    Fortunately, in the U.S., cataract surgery is safer and simpler than ever with results that cannot only improve your vision but can potentially do so and eliminate your need or dependency on glasses.

    Usually, cataracts develop slowly with little effect on vision. But as the cataract grows, vision becomes blurred, like looking through a cloudy lens or an impressionist painting.

  • U.S. 31E may become All-American Road

    By late August, U.S. 31E from Hodgenville to Bardstown, then U.S. 150 from Bardstown to Danville, could be designated an All-American Road. The designation is the highest in the National Scenic Byways Program, a part of the U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration. There are just 25 All-American Roads in the United States.

  • Pamida Foundation raises funds for back-to-school

    Pamida Foundation is holding the Back-to-School Pinup Program to benefit local schools. Funds are raised through customer donations and distributed to schools for the purchase of school supplies for underprivileged children.

    Customers may purchase pin-ups for $1 each in any Pamida store through Aug. 21.

    Each donation will go to a local school designated by the store. The Pamida Foundation will match up to $250 per community during the program.

  • Mitchell named band director at Marion County

    The 2009-10 Marion County High School Band’s marching season kicked off with a meet and greet introduction of their new band director, Shane Mitchell, on July 10.

    “The transition to our new director has been very smooth,” field commander Siana Dunn said. “I am excited about the direction the band is going this year. Even if we do not win finals, I know this year will be very successful.”

  • University begins classes in LaRue

    LaRue County is home to the Hawks. This fall it will also be home to the Tigers, as Campbellsville University will hold post secondary classes in Hodgenville for the first time.

  • New director shares vision for library

    Niki Carter, the new director of the LaRue County Public Library, sees the place as a community center where “people are encouraged to benefit themselves and the community.”

    “Our popular collections will always be here for the people, but we’re a source that focuses on the people’s needs; that’s where libraries have their staying power,” said Carter, who finished her master’s in library science from the University of Kentucky this semester. 

  • Kentucky Court of Appeals meets in LaRue County Courthouse

    A three-judge panel of the Kentucky Court of Appeals will conduct oral arguments in Hodgenville at 1:30 p.m. Wednesday.

    The oral arguments will be held in the circuit courtroom of the LaRue County Courthouse.

    The judges are Jeff S. Taylor from Owensboro; Glenn Acree from Lexington; and Kelly Thompson of Bowling Green.

  • Volleyball team supports cause

    The LaRue County High School volleyball team will host the Volley for the Cure game Tuesday, Sept. 1. The team will raise funds for breast cancer research and awareness through concessions, sale of pink ribbons and requesting donations that night.

    LCHS plays Central Hardin at 6 p.m.

    For more information, see Lisa DeWitt at LaRue Insurance or Deena Bradley at Magnolia Bank.

  • Insect pests have been detected in tobacco fields

    Growers may be seeing a lot of aphids in some tobacco fields. At this point in the season, the time left until topping is the major factor to consider when making a decision on aphid control. Yield and quality losses to aphids occur gradually – from the onset of infestation, about six weeks after transplant, until topping. Most of the loss is due to reduced leaf size and weight from heavy infestations. There is little chance for return from attempting to control heavy infestations just before harvest. The loss has already occurred.

  • Embracing paleness may lower risk of cancer

    Sophomore year - Marion County High School’s Valentine’s Day dance - that’s when it started.

    “It” being my obsession with being tan.

    I remember asking my mom if I could go to the tanning bed so that I could be tan in the little black number I bought for the dance. She hesitantly said yes, but tried to get one of her friends, Mary Lou Marrett, to talk me out of it. Mary Lou warned me of how bad it was for my skin, how it caused premature wrinkles and how it was highly addictive for some people.