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Today's News

  • How does your garden grow?

    Lee’s Garden Center Florist and Gift Shop has been around for a long time – 28 years, in fact – and is going to be a stop on the AGstravaganza tour on Aug. 9.

    The greenhouse and florist will serve as the foliage stop on the tour.

    According to Robin Lee, co-owner and wife to Scotty Lee, the business’s founder, visitors will be able to tour the greenhouse and see the plants and flowers learn about the growing process and see how the operation works.

  • Like a Rock

    The last year has been far from easy for Rock Brothers Dairy, but the family-owned farm is ready to bounce back, according to Chris Loyall, current farm caretaker and son-in-law to Gary Rock, the farm’s owner.

    Last June, a tornado came through the area and destroyed one of the main milk barns on the farm. According to Loyall, the family moved the cows that survived the storm to another farm, owned by Mike Hatcher in Russell County.

    Just weeks later, Gary suffered a devastating accident when he lost both legs in a silage chopper.

  • Homestead has history

    The second annual AGstravaganza will offer residents a chance on Saturday to experience the best of local agriculture. Several farming operations are opening their doors to the public from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

    The award-winning event is sponsored by LaRue County Farm Bureau.

    Visitors who tour a farm will receive a ticket to the night’s final event, a free supper and concert by country music artist J.D. Shelburne.

  • Internship brought writer out of her shell

    When I first applied for an internship through the Kentucky Press Association, I was not sure of what all it would entail. Obviously, I assumed that I would be writing, but even though I have been writing all my life and have taken journalism classes, it would’ve been wrong for me to call myself a journalist, because, frankly, I was not.

  • PHOTO: Straw bale gardening

    Hailey Speakman, 12, stands in front of her grandfather’s straw bale garden. Tim Speakman of Hodgenville experimented with growing tomatoes in straw bales – after having problems with blight in his garden. The bales have to be conditioned with water and fertilizer before the plants are added. When harvest is complete, the straw can be composted. Tomatoes have been plentiful in the “straw pot,” while squash did not produce well.

  • PHOTO: That's our Ivy

    Photo courtesy of WKU Athletics/Megan Stearman

    Miss Kentucky Basketball Ivy Brown donned her new Lady Topper uniform at a recent practice at Western Kentucky University.

  • PHOTO: Blackberry lily

    This blackberry lily was spotted growing in a field on Miller Road. The perennial has orange blooms with red dots. The flowers turn into seed pods which split open in late summer. The pods resemble a blackberry.

  • PHOTO: Rotary guest

    Patty Holbert, the expanded food and nutrition education program assistant for the LaRue County Extension Service, was last week’s guest at the Hodgenville Rotary Club. She is pictured with Rotarian Kyle Williamson.

  • UPDATED: City property found at Fairgrounds

    A reported burglary at the LaRue County Fairgrounds over the weekend has led to the recovery of numerous items belonging to the City of Hodgenville.

    LaRue County Fair Board President – and ousted mayor of Hodgenville - Terry Cruse reported that several items were taken from buildings at the fairgrounds either late Saturday or early Sunday, according to Police Chief Steve Johnson. One of the items was a Scag riding lawnmower owned by the City.

    Apparently, locks to both of the fairgrounds’ gates were cut by the perpetrator.

  • GRIBBINS' MURDER TRIAL: Day-to-day coverage

    Shortly before 9 p.m. Thursday, a jury of six men and six women found Christopher Gribbins guilty of wanton murder in the death of David Litsey Jr.

    After handing down their verdict, the jury went into a second deliberation to determine its recommended sentence. Mary Ann McClain Sapp of the probation and parole office testified that the jury could sentence Gribbins to 20-50 years or to life in prison. She added that he would have to serve 85 percent of his term or 20 years, whichever was less, before he would be eligible for parole.