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Today's News

  • Jamboree hosts gospel sing

    Joel Ray Sprowls’ Lincoln Jamboree hosted an evening of Gospel singing. Proceeds were donated to the Newspapers in Education, which provides newspapers to LaRue County classrooms. The groups performing were the Heartland Quartet and Redeemed.

  • Registration scheduled for youth basketball

    Sign-ups for Future Hawks Little League basketball will be 2-4 p.m. Nov. 8 at the LaRue County High School gym and 6:30-7 p.m. Nov. 9 at the gym. Sign-ups are for boys in grades kindergarten-sixth. Registration fee for kindergarten and first grade are $35 and second-sixth grades is $45.

    Each Future Hawk will receive uniform/shirt and attend a Kickoff Basketball Clinic given by the LCHS basketball staff. Games will be played on Saturdays.

    For information, contact Todd Rogers at 325-2929.

  • Dispatcher: Every call like a puzzle

    As a LaRue County 911 dispatcher – or telecommunicator for the politically correct – Daniel Highbaugh never knows what crisis awaits him when he answers the phone.

    “I’ve taken calls from people who have shot themselves, others were getting shot at, some have threatened suicide, or been in fights, or wrecks; for many of them, it’s a life and death situation,” the 2004 LaRue County High School graduate said.

  • Opposes proposed Internet restrictions

    This week, the FederalCommunicatios Commission is diving into a debate on an issue that could negatively impact the future of the Internet.       

    These meetings about so-called net neutrality regulations are taking place in Washington, D.C., but their ramifications will be felt across the Commonwealth if the FCC is successful in putting onerous new rules on the Internet.

  • Supports a federal carbon tax

    While some members of Congress sing the praises of cap-and-trade to combat climate change, I wonder if they have even bothered to look across the Atlantic Ocean to see how the same system has worked in Europe.

    Europe started a cap-and-trade system in the 1990s and studies show it has done next to nothing to stop the emission of greenhouse gasses.

  • Officials:ee^LaRue economy will benefit from horse games

    An estimated $150 million could be injected into the state’s economy when visitors converge on Kentucky for next summer’s Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games.

    LaRue County tourism and business leaders hope to harness some of that money.

    A group of 350 Australian horse enthusiasts already have confirmed a visit to LaRue County next summer to explore Abraham Lincoln and other popular sites, said Iris LaRue, director of the Lincoln Museum in Hodgenville

    “And we have others that are coming here,” she said.

  • Penny party planned

    The final Lincoln Bicentennial One-Cent Coin release in Washington, D.C., will be Nov. 12 at the Ulysses S. Grant Memorial near the intersection of First Street and Pennsylvania and Maryland avenues.

    Many from LaRue County will board a bus to attend the ceremony.

    As on Monday, 10 seats were available on the bus, said Rita Williams, an organizer of the event. Transportation costs are $112, excluding gratuity for the bus driver, she said.

    “We need to get our bus loaded,” she said.

  • U of L star to be featured at local softball clinic

    A fundamental softball clinic for girls in fifth-12th grade will be 9 a.m.-noon Nov. 21 at the LaRue County High School athletic facility. Former University of Louisville and Big East standout Kassie Stanfill, along with current and former U of L players, will conduct the clinic which is open to any girl in the LaRue, Hardin and Meade County area.

    Cost is $50. The first 30 responses will be accepted. If more than 30 sign up, an afternoon session will be made available. Deadline to register is Nov. 6, but early registration is encouraged.

  • Watch for ear rots in corn

    The University of Kentucky College of Agriculture’s Plant Disease Diagnostic Laboratory has diagnosed a number of cases of Diplodia Ear Rot this fall. While Diplodia is the most common ear rot of corn this is more than normal, but it isn’t surprising, given the weather conditions experienced this growing season.

  • Drive Smart Kentucky

    Motor vehicle crashes remain the leading cause of death among adolescents and young adults in the U.S. Here in Kentucky, statistics from the Transportation Cabinet show that drivers between the ages of 15 and 20 were involved in more than 26,000 collisions in 2008, resulting in 141 fatalities. Seventy-percent of those killed were teenagers. According to the National Transportation Safety Board, 16-year-old drivers are more than twice as likely to be involved in fatal crashes as older drivers.