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Today's News

  • Christmas in a Shoebox worth the effort

    It’s that time of year again when we are given the wonderful opportunity to provide Christmas for a child who otherwise will receive no gifts — maybe not even know it is Christmas or about Christmas — maybe has never heard of Jesus. The public is invited to pack all of Christmas possible into a shoebox or pack a couple or many; and share our love and the love of Jesus with a child perhaps in North America or in the remotest parts of the earth.

  • Goat and sheep farmers vote to assess own stock

    Kentucky sheep and goat producers voted in favor of check-offs to assess themselves at a rate of one-half of 1 percent of the net market price of their animals.

    In separate referenda held Oct. 1 in county Extension offices throughout the state, goat producers approved check-offs by a 75-41 vote, and sheep producers approved by a 32-12 count.

    A date when check-off funds will begin to be collected has not been determined.

  • Fundraiser calendar

    Hodgenville Fall Festival

    Hodgenville Elementary School’s fall festival will begin at 6 p.m. Nov. 13 with a chili supper, silent auction, games and other activities. There is a $25 charge to set up a vendor booth. Proceeds go to the PTSO. Call Sonya Turner at 734-6084 to reserve a booth.  

    Lane Lincoln Thanksgiving Banquet

  • Ruth Graham led simple, yet inspiring life

    While my wife and I were traveling in North Carolina last week, we visited the Billy Graham Library in Charlotte.

    Walking through the Prayer Garden, we were impressed at the simplicity of the grave of his wife, Ruth Bell Graham, who died in 2007.  

    An ordinary field stone, like many of its kind in that area, marks her grave. Inscribed at the top is the Chinese figure for righteousness, appropriate because she was born and reared in China, the daughter of missionaries there, and always retained her love for the Chinese people.

  • Free vaccine clinic available to a few today

    Community Health Educator

    The LaRue County Health Department will hold an H1N1 flu clinic 4-6 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 17, for target populations only.

  • LCHS holds basketball preview Friday

    LaRue County High School will hold its basketball Blue/White Night on Friday.

    It begins with a fundraising chili supper from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in the high school cafeteria. The meal is $5 and includes chili, sandwich, drink and desserts.

    At 7 p.m., varsity, JV, freshman and middle school basketball players will be introduced in the gym. The varsity Hawks and Lady Hawks will have intrasquad scrimmages.

  • Locals enter livestock exposition

    The North American International Livestock Exposition has five local entries from Ashley Hornback of Magnolia entering a limousin in the beef division; and Cody Howell and Tyler Howell, both of Hodgenville, have entered two head of beef in the junior hereford division.

    Meredith Heath and Weston Heath of Hodgenville have entered five head of cattle.

  • Five escape fiery crash

    Five men survived a fiery crash Saturday when the pickup truck they were riding in overturned.

    The driver, Aaron Morales, 34, of Magnolia has been charged with operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol, aggravating circumstances; no operator’s license; and four counts of first-degree wanton endangerment.

    According to Deputy Matt Darst, who investigated the crash, Morales “blew a .252 on the breathalyzer,” more than three times the legal limit.

  • Judge orders 'no more pit bulls' for woman charged in dog attack

    A Hodgenville woman entered a guilty plea to one count of harboring a vicious animal in LaRue District Court.

    Robin Humphrey was charged after a 2-year-old in her care was attacked by one of Humphrey’s pit bulls on East Leafdale Road, according to the LaRue County Sheriff’s office. The toddler was flown to Kosair Children’s Hospital in Louisville for treatment of facial injuries.

  • Bell brothers create 'vintage' pedal mower

    It all started with two boys being boys, messing around in the garage and getting into dad’s tools. By the time dad walked in and saw what they were up to, they gave him an idea. It turned out to be a big hit and the talk of Creekfront Park during the Lincoln Days Antique Tractor Show.

    For most people, seeing it once wasn’t enough. They all seemed to come back and see it again and point it out to a friend.