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Today's News

  • Magistrates hear road report

    Timmy Brown, county road supervisor, told members of LaRue County Fiscal Court that his crews spread about 50 tons of salt during last week’s snow storm.

    “That is the normal amount of salt we would use due to the temperature staying near the freezing mark,” he reported as magistrates met Feb. 9 at the courthouse in Hodgenville.

    Brown said the county has 125 more tons of salt on hand, enough for about two more rounds over the county’s roads. 

  • Jesus came to earth to minister to man

    Jesus said, “The Son of Man came not to be ministered unto, but to minister.”  He also said to his disciples, “So send I you.” He had a ministry and so do we as Christians.

    In 1 Peter 3:18-22 Peter speaks of Jesus’ ministry. First, he spoke of the death of Christ. He was the “Just One” who was treated unjustly. Why? That he might die for the unjust and bring them to God he died as a substitute for us (2:24). Peter tells us that Jesus suffered for well-doing and not because of any sins he committed (2:22).

  • Housing needed for influx of soldiers

    I recently had the privilege of meeting with the leadership of the 3rd Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, at their new Fort Knox headquarters. Col. Christopher Toner and his team want to do all they can to help their soldiers and families settle in to our region and we wanted to be sure they knew our region was here to make this job easier. I expressed the great affection our communities have for soldiers and their families and how appreciative we all are for their brave service.

  • Schools closed again Tuesday

    LaRue County Schools have canceled classes for Tuesday. The district also was out on Monday because of snow and slick road conditions.

  • Jobless rates up again

  • Woman sentenced to five years in sexual abuse case

    A Hodgenville woman entered an Alford plea to one count of first-degree sexual abuse in LaRue Circuit Court.

    Tammy Skaggs, 35, was charged originally with two counts of second-degree sodomy and two counts of first-degree sexual abuse in 2008 after accusations made by a 14-year-old boy. The boy, according to Hodgenville City Police, is considered mentally incapacitated.

    The remaining three counts were dismissed.

    Monday, she was sentenced to five years to be conditionally discharged five years. Probation was denied and she was ordered to register as a sex offender.

  • Birthday girl bumps Lincoln

    I had planned a column about Abraham Lincoln this week because it is nearly his birthday (201 years) and he was born here after all.

    But a monumental event occurred a few days early that overshadowed any thoughts of our 16th President. He’ll have to wait another week.

    Friday, my daughter Amanda gave birth to my second granddaughter after a relatively short labor. At least it was much shorter than Amanda’s labor with her first baby.

    I was exhausted afterwards. Birthing babies is hard work.

  • General Assembly back in session

    As you read this, the 2010 General Assembly Session has convened. It will be a 60-day session in which our first priority will be developing a budget under serious financial constraints. We also will be looking at pro-life legislation, legislative retirement reform, government transparency, allowing the people to decide on whether they would like to expand gambling, as well as other issues. It promises to be a busy session.

  • How long will our United States ‘Camelot’ last?

    Not untypically, many of us in these United States believe we have the best country there is – that it has both the best political and economic systems. While not exactly utopia or Camelot of King Arthur fame, we believe it is the best humanity has yet devised.

    While I am not a professional historian, I do know that there are many major wonderful (and not so wonderful) world powers that have come and gone over decades, centuries and millennia. One of the tasks in studying history seems to be to get acquainted with these powers and what happened as they evolved.

  • Main Street thanks

    Main Street relies on help from our friends such as the Lincoln Museum, Chamber of Commerce, City of Hodgenville, board members and directors.

    The value of a volunteer group such as the Genealogy Society is easy to show in matching hours contributed toward the Historic District expansion project. The value of volunteers is hard to assess and impossible to overstate. The recent luncheon is a case in point. The Community Room cost ($100) was donated (a frequent happening for us) by the Lincoln Museum.