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Today's News

  • Judge orders removal of signs along I-65

    A judge ordered the removal of religious signs near the Upton exit of Interstate 65 but an appeal is planned.

    In what Senior Judge Geoffrey P. Morris called an “extremely interesting case,” the state Transportation Cabinet claimed the postings are in violation of billboard advertising statutes. Jimmy Harston of Allen County, who said he erected the signs at the request of two property owners, said the messages are not ads but expressions covered by Constitutional protections of free speech and religious expressions.

  • Films focus again on Abe

    Three years ago, we learned that Steven Spielberg planned to make a movie about our Abe Lincoln. The opening was to coincide with the 200th anniversary of the birth of the 16th President.

    If you’re a movie-goer, you may have noticed, ahem, no Lincoln movie.

    We ran a front page story with photos of Liam Neeson and Holly Hunter reading lines in front of a gathering of the Lincoln Bicentennial Commission. (Sally Field has since been cast in the role of Mary Todd.) We reported on Neeson’s fact-finding visit to Hodgenville in preparation of the role.

  • Migrant Education staff appreciates students

    The Migrant Education staff would like to thank all the students from Abraham Lincoln Elementary and Hodgenville Elementary who participated in the Christmas mitten and toboggan collection. Many of the students gave up their classroom Christmas gift exchange and instead brought in mittens, gloves and toboggans for students in need. Many migrant and Spanish speaking adults and children received the gloves and toboggans, which have been a blessing during this cold weather.

    Sarah Hornback, Family Services Director

    Rosa Kelly, Migrant Recruiter

  • Hawks play Thursday in 5th Region Tournament

    LaRue County (17-9) will play Taylor County (17-13) in the final first-round game in the boys' 5th Region Tournament.

    The Hawks' game is scheduled for 8 p.m. Thursday, March 4, at Nelson County High School in Bardstown.

    The tournament opens at 6 p.m. Wednesday with Campbellsville taking on Green County followed by host Nelson County playing Elizabethtown. The first game Thursday matches North Hardin against Bardstown.

    The eight-team, single-elimination tournament pits four district champions and the district runners-up.

  • Crowd offers opinions on laptop initiative

    Winter weather may have delayed the February school board meeting, but it was definitely heated up by the presentation of the 21st century learning initiative Laptops of LaRue.

    Thursday, the LaRue County High School Media Center was packed to standing room only with students, teachers, parents and community members who wished to share their support or concerns with the initiative.

  • Lessons from World War II

    Running, hiding, crawling and hunting. These are only a few of the things that Jews had to do while escaping the German Nazis in World War II. They traveled through tunnels to get to forests. They lived inside forests with their family groups. The food they got they stole from nearby people. Jews stayed in these forest family camps for their own survival and to stay safe from the Nazis.

    The underground tunnels allowed the Jews to stay hidden until they found a safe house.

  • Organization's help stretches from Haiti to hometowns

    Whether working to support an international relief effort in Haiti or responding to the need of local fire victims, the American Red Cross' Hardin-LaRue Chapter depends on the benevolence of private contributions.

    Although chartered by federal legislation in 1917, the Red Cross receives no recurring government appropriation, Sharon Thompson, director of the local chapter, told the LaRue County Chamber of Commerce's February luncheon.

  • Trial delayed again for former jail deputy

    There has been another delay in the trial of a former LaRue County deputy jailer facing 11 counts of felony theft in Indiana.

    Jennie McGee, 46, of Falls of Rough was arrested on fugitive charges by Kentucky State Police at her workplace Feb. 8, 2009.

    She pleaded not guilty to the charges and was to be tried by jury Oct. 12, according to Perry County, Ind., court documents.

    McGee’s attorney withdrew from the case in October and a new one took over her defense.

  • Exercise in First Amendment leads to articles about Nazis, democracy and Christianity

    Students on the sixth grade Kids.com team at LaRue County Middle School recently created a feature article in their social studies class. Teacher Jim B. Phelps said students were able to choose any topic that they had studied in social studies class up to this point in the year.

  • Communism is interesting, but who would want to live like that?

    What’s your government and economy type? Is it communism? Communism has a unique history. For the government they have dictatorship. With communism, people have very little freedom.

    The dictator controls all political freedoms. A dictator is the leader and makes all laws for the people. The ruler usually takes over by force and relies on the police and military to come into and keep power. Some people say that a dictator rules with an “iron grip.” 

    Communism doesn’t end here; it also has a command economy.