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Today's News

  • Diabetes on the rise - are you at risk?

    In 2005, about 8.9 percent of Kentucky’s adult population had been diagnosed with diabetes. Diabetes is the number one cause of disability for Kentuckians and the fifth leading cause of death by disease. Among the 50 states, Kentucky ranks seventh for having the highest number in the adult population diagnosed with diabetes.

    The cost of diabetes in both life and medical care is alarming. In 2002 about 2.9 billion dollars was spent on treating diabetes in Kentucky. Preventing this catastrophic disease is a priority.

  • Training offered to review changes to food code

    Lincoln Trail District Health Department will provide training sessions to review changes to Kentucky’s Food Code in Grayson, Hardin, LaRue, Marion, Meade, Nelson and Washington counties. The target audience will include facilities holding food permits.

    “We want to make sure all of the restaurants, grocers, and food suppliers in our area understand the changes to the state’s food code before they take effect," said Sara Jo Best, environmental director at Lincoln Trail District Health Department.

  • Community bids farewell to hero

    Lance Cpl. Matthias “Matt” Hanson was laid to rest Saturday.

    About 1,000 people attended the young marine’s funeral in LaRue County High School’s gymnasium.

    Hanson, the 20-year-old son of Mary and Larry Huff of Hodgenville and Lowell R. and Cynthia Hanson Jr. of Buffalo, died Feb. 21 of combat-related injuries in Afghanistan. He was hit by enemy fire and died while being airlifted to a military medical facility.

    His deployment to Afghanistan was his first assignment outside the country. He had been overseas about 40 days.

  • Jail car used in escape

    A LaRue County inmate enjoyed about eight hours of freedom last week after escaping from the detention center in a car owned by the jail.

    George Richard Gaunt III, 21, of Ludlow in northern Kentucky was serving a three-year sentence at the facility on charges of third-degree burglary, theft by unlawful taking and receiving stolen property.

    According to Chief Deputy Travis Strader, Gaunt attended a religious service at the jail about 7 p.m. Feb. 9 and left through a back door sometime later.

  • Woman jailed after taking money for ill child's expenses

    A woman who admitted taking money intended for a sick child was sentenced to 10 days in county jail Wednesday.

    Theresa Ann Cox, 43, of Louisville was charged Feb. 16 with two counts of theft by unlawful taking by Hodgenville City Police. Court records indicate she entered two IGA Express stores, picked up several items and placed them in a bag from the store. Each time, she presented the items to the clerk and requested a refund, according to Lt. Steve Johnson. The items included cell phone accessories and snacks.

  • Education available free to veterans

    Veterans Upward Bound at Western Kentucky University is accepting applications from veterans to attend its free educational program.

    VUB is a federal program, funded by the U.S. Department of Education, to help U.S. military veterans enter into and succeed in postsecondary school. It is a non-profit, free of charge program serving veterans from the Bowling Green area along with 11 surrounding counties.

  • Boxer fined $453 for traffic stop

    Nick Rupa, 44, of Nashville, Tenn., was arraigned Jan. 13 on a charge of operating on a suspended license in LaRue District Court.

    The former boxer, who went 10 rounds with the Light Middleweight Champion of the World, was recognized by District Judge C. Derek Reed. Rupa, who is originally from Trinidad, told the judge he had lost to Terry Norris (career record of 47-9-0 with 31 knockouts) in 1997 for the middleweight championship.

    Reed set a new court date and bond at $500 on condition of no driving.

  • Alfalfa Conference to be held in Cave City

    The Kentucky Alfalfa Conference will be 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Feb. 25 at the Cave City Convention Center. Topics include advances in alfalfa seed, the value of crop rotations, alfalfa hay for horses, alfalfa baleage, grazing alfalfa, varieties for the future, alfalfa for wildlife and production and marketing. The conference will have its largest-ever silent auction. An awards program is also on the agenda.

    Preregistration is not necessary. The cost to attend is $15 for adults and $5 for students. Certified Crop Adviser credits are available.

  • Tuition assistance may ease counseling shortage

    Some Kentucky schools and communities are experiencing a shortage of counselors that is projected to increase. To help meet the need, scholarship assistance is being offered by the Kentucky Counseling Association.

    Those interested in becoming school or mental health counselors, and who already possess an undergraduate degree, can get a jump start this summer with help with tuition and textbooks.

    The association provides grants of $200 for textbooks.

  • Tuition assistance may ease counseling shortage

    Some Kentucky schools and communities are experiencing a shortage of counselors that is projected to increase. To help meet the need, scholarship assistance is being offered by the Kentucky Counseling Association.

    Those interested in becoming school or mental health counselors, and who already possess an undergraduate degree, can get a jump start this summer with help with tuition and textbooks.

    The association provides grants of $200 for textbooks.