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Today's News

  • A new walk for a new man

    When you accept the grace of God by faith, trusting in the finished work of Christ on the cross for your sin, you become a child of God.

    Paul says in 2 Corinthians 5:17, “Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creature … all things have become new.”

    For the new Christian a metamorphose takes place like the caterpillar being transformed into a butterfly. Spiritually, we are a new person in Christ.

  • Automotive industry becomes regional point of pride

    For more than a century, America has had a fascination – a love affair, some say – with automobiles.

    Cars and trucks are more than transportation for us. In fact, few things are so deeply rooted in our culture. After all, most of us can hum the tune of “Little Red Corvette,” or “409” and recognize celebrity cars from Steve McQueen’s Mustang to Herbie the Love Bug.

    But part of what gives cars and trucks such a place in our hearts, especially in Kentucky, is our hand in making these celebrated machines.

  • Get the skills employers want most

    Every job requires a certain mix of skills and knowledge. A welder must read blueprints, retailers must have merchandising knowledge, software developers typically need to know C++ and so on.

    Yet, the skills that many employers value the most apply to nearly every position in every field. These skills, commonly referred to as soft skills, can give you an incredible edge whether you’re looking for your next career opportunity or already on the job.

  • Applicants: Show your soft skills before you even get the job

    There’s no doubt that employers value soft skills – work ethic, communications skills, a positive attitude and more.

    In fact, in a CareerBuilder survey of more than 2,100 hiring managers and human resources professionals earlier this year, 77 percent said soft skills were as important as hard skills. Sixteen percent said soft skills associated with personal attributes and character are more important than hard skills such as operating a computer program or machinery when evaluating candidates for a job.

  • Kentucky Career Center provides free services to job seekers

    The Kentucky Career Center – Lincoln Trail offers free services to job seekers and employers, including customized hiring events and career counseling. The staff also can help students and job seekers interested in training for in-demand careers find resources to pay tuition.

    LaRue County native Lucas Chaudoin first visited the career center before his junior year at Lindsey Wilson College. Career center staff determined he was eligible for Workforce Investment Act funding for tuition for the last two years of his bachelor’s degree.

  • LCHS students get down to business

    Students in an LaRue County High School business class are learning there’s more to working than just going in and sitting at a desk all day.

    Business teacher Jennifer Bernard is doing her best to prepare her students to enter the workforce when they graduate. She’s going about it by teaching a variety of life skills in her courses. She said that students are learning business skills, such as management, public speaking, budgeting and the like, as well as things like photo editing, design, reporting, writing and copy editing.

  • LCHS students learn about teamwork

    Students at LaRue County High School are getting more than they bargained for from their English class this year. Summer Garris’ students are learning there’s more to education than regurgitating facts.

    This semester, Garris has instituted a new method of learning. The class is working on a group project that consists of reading a book, discussing it and holding a public forum about it for their class.

  • LaRue begins ‘Work Ready’ process

    Several surrounding counties have been announced as being either “Work Ready” or “Work Ready In Progress.”

    The designation is a “measure of a county’s workforce quality. It is an assurance to business and industry that the community is committed to providing the highly-skilled workforce required in today’s competitive global economy,” according to workready.ky.gov.

  • PHOTO: Working in class
  • PHOTO: Laughing with the laptop