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Today's News

  • Homecoming is Friday

    The Hawks football team had a week off. They return to play at 8 p.m. Friday against Russell County in a Homecoming game.

    Remaining home games are 7:30 p.m. Oct.11 against Henry County; and 7:30 p.m. Oct. 25 against Central Hardin.

    The Hawks play at Elizabethtown 7:30 p.m. Oct. 18; and Campbellsville 7:30 p.m. Nov. 1.

  • Dawson heads to State

    LOUISVILLE — LaRue County freshman Cameron Dawson joined elite company Monday.

    Dawson shot a 3-over-par 75 at the Boys’ 5th Region Golf Tournament on Monday at South Park Country Club in Louisville to earn a spot in next week’s Leachman Buick GMC Cadillac/KHSAA State Golf Championships.

    Dawson became only the fourth LaRue County player to qualify for the state tournament since 1999. Kyle Meredith did it in 2010, Cory Cox in 2004 and Tyson Catlett in 2003. The state tournament will be held Oct. 8-9 at Bowling Green Country Club.

  • Seniors honored Wednesday

    The Hawks defeated Wayne County 4-0 Saturday in varsity soccer action.
    Coach Derek Bell said the entire team earned MVP honors.

    “Saturday was a chance for the Hawks to get it together and become the team they promise to be,” said Bell. “Without a home win or clean sheet this season, could they turn the corner? The answer was yes and how.”

    Within the first minute, junior Christian Hensley scored the opening goal. It was followed by a goal from junior Miguel Martinez.

  • MAXINE; Pieces of history in Oak Hill...
  • MAXINE; Tucker Cemetery holds area founders

    Tucked away near Tucker Creek lies Tucker Cemetery.

    Established in the 1850s, the cemetery is located on the west side of highway 357 between Maxine and Tanner; however, it is no longer visible from the road due to surrounding foliage.

    The cemetery, although unknown to passers by, contains the graves of a one-time prominent family of LaRue County – the Tuckers.

    Anderson Tucker and Nancy Hawkins Tucker married in 1820 in Stokes County, N.C., before making the trek to Kentucky in 1842.

  • MAXINE; Oak Hill School

    Oak Hill School was picture perfect with its white painted clapboards, a large post with an iron bell and pull chord out front, and a magnificent cedar tree reaching its branches just behind it.

    Only a few decades ago the one-room schoolhouse stood behind Oak Hill Baptist Church, the first church established in the Maxine area. The school and church were built in the 1850s.

    The family of Anderson and Nancy Tucker were the original owners of the land the school was built on.

  • MAXINE; Oak Hill Baptist Church predates Civil War

    Oak Hill Baptist Church rests in a bend on Oak Hill Road, surrounded by oak trees –which is how the church received its name.

    A little more than 157 years ago, on April 30, 1856, 35 former members of Three Forks Bacon Creek Baptist Church signed a petition to separate to form Oak Hill Baptist Church.

  • MAXINE; McCubbin’s memories of Maxine

    Nancy McCubbin, once a Pennington, grew up in Maxine and watched as the small community changed over the years.

    “It was quite different from today,” said McCubbin.

    “I remember Maxine – Maggard’s store. It was there for years and was more of a general store. They sold a small amount of things that you could get at Wal-Mart today.”

    McCubbin said she grew up living next to the store on Oak Hill Road.

  • MAXINE: Maxine store was a local business hub

    Maxine’s name, although a mystery, was thought to have received its name from the Maxine Store, the long-standing main establishment in the quaint community.

    The store was first opened by Albert and Millie Hazle in the late 1800s, and was then sold to Mattie and Harvey Ward, who ran the store for several years.

    John Edward “Ed” and Halcye Wheeler ran the store from the 1920s to the 1960s.  

  • Avery to speak at ECTC

     Environmental social activist and Kentucky resident Sam Avery is coming to Elizabethtown Community and Technical College to discuss his recent book on the controversial Keystone XL natural gas pipeline, The Pipeline and the Paradigm.

    A former instructor at ECTC as well as a certified solar installer and trainer in nonviolent resistance techniques, Avery will discuss the need for “a new, larger worldview (or paradigm)” that puts economic necessities within a larger frame that includes preserving the environment.