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Today's News

  • Regional Transportation and Highway Safety Committee to meet

    @font-face { }@font-face { }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 0.0001pt; font-size: 10pt; }table.MsoNormalTable { font-size: 10pt; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; }The Regional Transportation and Highway Safety Committee will meet 10:30 a.m. Sept. 15 at the KYTC Highway District Office in Elizabethtown. The purpose is to identify problem areas within identified dangerous corridors in LaRue, Nelson, Hardin, Marion, Grayson, Breckinridge and Washington Counties.

    The committee will look at potential low-cost solutions.

  • Lincoln Memorial Building now open to park visitors

    It has been a year since visitors to the Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historic Park were allowed inside the Memorial Building.

    The building, which houses the traditional birthplace cabin of the 16th president, was closed in September 2009 to solve longstanding mold problems and issues with the heating and air system. The work took several months longer than expected and cost about $1.5 million, according to park officials.

  • Clogging lessons offered Tuesdays at parks

    The Lincoln Cloggers meet Tuesdays at the LaRue County Parks and Recreation Center, 200 City Park Road, Hodgenville.

    For more information, contact Bonita Pendleton at 766-2398 or e-mail bonneta@scrtc.com.

  • Woman recovering from Old E'town Road wreck

    A Hodgenville woman is in serious condition in a Louisville hospital following a single-vehicle crash.

    Pamela Jewell Tabor, 27, was driving a 1996 Dodge Intrepid on Old Elizabethtown Road near the intersection of Carter Brothers Road about 7 p.m. Sept. 7 when she lost control of the vehicle.

  • Upton Days begins Friday

    The Upton Days Festival begins Friday evening with a fish fry, silent auction and home canning contest.

  • Bowens' basement salutes lower 48 states

    When Eddie Bowen wants to refer to a map of the USA, he need look no farther than a stone wall in the basement of his log cabin home in Magnolia.

    Bowen created the 8x15-foot map of the contiguous 48 states by cutting various shaped rocks into recognizable individual states and adhering them to a concrete wall.

    “I really owe this idea to my fifth-grade teacher, Jesse Ruth Hunt, who imprinted in our minds the shapes of the states so we could name them if we saw them,” Bowen said.     

  • Amount of 'Payday Loans' now monitored on state database

    You have probably heard them called deferred deposit checks, cash advance loans, payday loans, or post-dated check loans. Whatever they are called, these loans always share certain features. They are all for a short term, for a small amount, and have a high service fee. They are the most expensive type of “loan” available and should be used only as a last option.

  • Amount of 'Payday Loans' now monitored on state database

    You have probably heard them called deferred deposit checks, cash advance loans, payday loans, or post-dated check loans. Whatever they are called, these loans always share certain features. They are all for a short term, for a small amount, and have a high service fee. They are the most expensive type of “loan” available and should be used only as a last option.

  • Man dies after I-65 crash

    An Indiana man died Tuesday as a result of injuries sustained in a motorcycle crash on Interstate 65.

    Greely D. Evans, 66, was driving a 1990 Honda motorcycle north near exit 81 about 4:46 p.m. and was “slow to recognize that traffic had stopped” as he approached a construction zone, according to Kentucky State Police.

  • Scammers go on the prowl as soon as floodwaters recede

    When floodwaters subside, one of the first things to float to the surface is the scam artist.

    The Kentucky Division of Emergency Management, Federal Emergency Management Agency and the U.S. Small Business Administration remind businesses and homeowners to be wary of individuals who may try to take advantage of you.

    The most common types of fraud after disaster strikes are scam artists, contractor fraud, and identity theft.

    Remember: FEMA and the SBA never charge a fee for processing disaster aid.