.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • 4-H Achievement Trip
  • Yellowjackets are out and about, be careful with these helpful tips

       The appearance of yellowjackets is one sure sign fall is on its way. Actually these fairly small unpredictable, stinging pests have been around this summer feeding on other insects. Most of us simply haven’t noticed them.

  • Four 'Distinguished Alumni' honored by schools

     The LaRue County Board of Education has announced four inductees as LaRue County Schools Distinguished Alumni. 

    Phyllis Higdon Gentry, Dr. Brandon Houk, John E. Hornback, and Capt. Mark D. Turner, M.D., will be honored at a luncheon on Oct. 4 at the LaRue County Extension Office.

  • SOCCER: Meet the Lady Hawks

     Having brought home an 18th District runner-up trophy last season, LaRue County High School’s girls’ soccer team is taking it one game at a time this year, according to girls’ head coach Laura Kudrna.

  • $10,000 lottery ticket unclaimed

     Lincoln General Store on Lincoln Farm Road, Hodgenville, sold a winning lottery ticket during its grand opening in July.

    The $10,000 winner of the Decades for Dollars drawing has not stepped forward.

    Regina McDowell, who co-owns Lincoln General with her husband Gary, said the Kentucky Lottery has confirmed the winning ticket was sold from their store. But, they don’t know the name of the person who bought it.

  • Judge/executive Association to battle pipeline

     The Kentucky Judge/executive’s Association plans to tackle the Bluegrass Pipeline in upcoming months.

    LaRue County Judge/executive Tommy Turner, the legislative chairman of the Association, said the group’s focus points are limiting power of eminent domain and more oversight of natural gas liquid pipelines.

  • WHITE CITY; White City was a grocery capital

    In its heyday, White City was the home of several stores and was once considered to be a main stop on the way between Hodgenville and other towns such as Elizabethtown or New Haven.

    According to Richard Taylor, a former long-time resident of White City, there were once four stores and a supermarket located in the area.

    The first store to come to town was Anderson’s, run by William “Bill” Anderson, the same Anderson that was visited by Mr. Morrison, credited with coming up with the hamlet’s name.

  • HOWARDSTOWN; F.M. Head grocery photos
  • WHITE CITY; St. Joachim or Mulhall Chapel Cemetery still in use

    Saint Joachim Catholic Church Cemetery, one of the oldest cemeteries in LaRue County, is about a mile east of White City on Howardstown Road.

    The church was established about 1850 by Father Thomas A. Mulhall Sr., the son of Thomas Kempis Mulhall Sr., who emigrated from Ireland in the early 1800’s.

    Thomas A. Mulhall Sr. built a log cabin church in the White City area that was not far from where the cemetery is located.

    The church was once referred to as Mulhall Chapel. It burned a couple of decades later.  

  • WHITE CITY: Baby Lincoln’s gravemarker uncovered in 1933

    Despite his many family ties in Kentucky, Thomas Lincoln was a wanderer. First settling in Elizabethtown with his new bride, he became restless and moved to the Sinking Spring Farm in LaRue County. In 1809, he bought land on Knob Creek, only a few miles east of Sinking Spring.

    After a land dispute in 1816, he again packed up and set off for Indiana with wife Nancy, daughter Sarah, and son Abraham, leaving behind only two small cabins which quickly fell to ruin.