Today's News

  • Kentucky schools to begin using new accountability model

    The mandates of 2009’s Senate Bill 1, along with state regulations, provide the blueprint for Kentucky’s public school accountability model.

  • Diabetes Coalition Meetings

    Managing meals
    The program “Managing Your Meals” is 10 a.m. Feb. 17 at the Lincoln Trail District Health Department. The initial class will cover how to follow a meal plan, and gather information to develop a meal plan for each individual.
    A follow-up class is 1:30-2:30 p.m. and reviews how individuals are doing with meal plans and teaches a new topic.
    The classes and meal plans will be conducted by a registered dietitian or nurse depending on topic and availability. Registration is required by calling 270-769-1601, Ext. 1035.

  • BBB advice: Proceed with caution with dating online

     Are you looking for love?
    Millions use dating and social networking sites to meet people. While many are looking to start a successful relationship, there are those using these sites to take advantage of others. Unfortunately, the anonymity of the Internet makes it easy for con artists to use these sites to meet potential victims.

  • Realities of prescription pill abuse drive summit

    Prescription drug abuse has become so prevalent in parts of Kentucky, people are buying Mason jars of clean urine at flea markets and under the table at tobacco stores so they can pass drug tests.
    Kentuckians are pulling out their own teeth so they can go to the dentist to get a three-day prescription for hydrocodone, the most popular painkiller.
    When they make arrests, law enforcement officers are finding stacks of food stamps that have been traded for pills.

  • Dean’s List Somerset Community College

    Elisabeth Sheeley, of Hodgenville, was named to Somerset Community College Dean’s List for the fall semester.
    To be a member of the Dean’s List, a student must maintain a 3.5 grade point average and be a full-time student. A full-time student must take 12 credit hours during a semester, excluding developmental classes.

  • News of Record

    Property Transfers
    The following property transfers are listed as given on deeds at the LaRue County Clerk’s Office in Hodgenville.

    Mark A. Greenleaf and Joyce T. Greenleaf to Snow Storm Properties LLC, tracts 2, 3, 4 and 5 of the Marty and Theresa Lee Agricultural Division, $185,350
    Wayne Burch and Karen Burch to Francis M. Howard an Judine Howard, property at 152 Hamilton Heights Ave., Hodgenville, $84,000
    J. Lee Bell Jr. and Carrie Bell to Norman R. Klinglesmith and Tonya J. Klinglesmith, lot 18 of Northridge, Hodgenville, $174,500

  • Community Calendar updated 2-15-12

    Chamber of Commerce luncheon
    The LaRue County Chamber of Commerce monthly luncheon is noon-1 p.m. Feb. 15 at the Lincoln Museum Community Room. The guest speaker is Lisa Williams of Kentucky Innovation Center.

    Parkinson’s Support Group
    The Parkinson’s Support Group will meet 4 p.m. Feb. 16 at HealthSouth Lakeview Rehabilitation Hospital, 134 Heartland Dr., Elizabethtown. For more information, call 769-3100, Ext. 357.

    FREE SEMINAR: Heart Health at HMH

  • Community News: Georgetown

    Georgetown, John Smith: Kaye Curle will have surgery Wednesday at Hardin Memorial Hospital. Sammy Montgomery remains a patient at University of Louisville Hospital. Dolvinia Watson was at church Sunday after being ill. It was good to see her out.
    Sunday morning, the guest speaker at First Baptist was Elder Henry Watson, the associate minister at Main Street Baptist Church, Lexington. Hodgenville Choir provided the music. After the morning service was the baptism of Trinity Cleaver. Many friends and family attended.

  • PHOTO: Proclamation signed in honor of Black History Month
  • Plant Hardiness Zone Map shows slight changes for LaRue

    For the first time since 1990, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has updated its Plant Hardiness Zone Map.
    Plant hardiness zone designations represent the average annual extreme minimum temperatures. Low temperature during the winter is a crucial factor in the survival of plants, according to the USDA.
    LaRue County is among the areas that have been upgraded for planting temperatures due to the overall warming trend. Although that probably won’t make that much difference to gardeners, according to LaRue County Extension Agent David Harrison.