Today's News

  • COLUMN: Oh baby, it costs a lot to raise a baby

     What does it cost to raise a child from birth through age 17? Using data from the Consumer Expenditure Survey, the U.S. Department of Agriculture reports that in 2003, it averaged $130,290 when household income was below $40,700; $178,590 when household income was between $40,700 and $68,400; and $261,270 when household income was more than $68,400.

  • BASKETBALL: Hawks defeat Adair County, 48-41

     The LaRue County Hawks picked up a win (48-41) on the road Jan. 8 against the Adair County Indians.

    Coach Paul Childress said he was proud of the resiliency demonstrated by his team.

    “Any time you go to Adair County, you know what to expect,” he said. Coach (Mark) Fudge does an excellent job with his teams. They will always defend you exceptionally well and you have to earn every point against them. We knew going into the game that if we played well, it would be a grind for us.”

  • Students graduate from CU's nursing program

     Campbellsville University’s School of Nursing graduated 28 students in December, the largest nursing class yet.

    Three local students participated in pinning ceremony: Gary E. Drake of Hodgenville; Addie Hawkins of Magnolia; and Brittany Skaggs of Mount Sherman.

    Dr. Bob Wade, dean of the School of Nursing, presented Hawkins with an academic excellence award.

  • PHOTO: Campbellsville University nursing students

     Campbellsville University nursing graduates were honored in December. Front from left, Mary Wise, Kristen Wilson, Jessica Ulrich, Jodi Tungate, Connie Robertson, Brittany Skaggs, Brenda Smith, Kelly Stone; second row, Joni Reynolds, Keely Pittman, Krysta Lenington, Amanda Anderson, Addie Hawkins, Brittany Knifley, Amy Leeds; third row, James Edmonds, Gary Drake, Leeta Dial, Sally Butler, Suzanne Davis, Amanda Conner; back, Christy Burriss, Tabatha Bryant, Mary Brock, Amanda Booher, Angie Atwood, Stephanie Akin, Cassandra Blevins and Kymberleigh Carter.

  • ALES library dedicated to Thurman

     It’s been a year since Amber Thurman, former principal of Abraham Lincoln Elementary School, died in a car crash.

    The 47-year-old left behind two children, Zachary and Sarah, and a host of friends and students.

    On the anniversary of her death (Jan. 7), ALES staff and students held a ceremony renaming the school’s library in Thurman’s honor.

  • Six indicted by grand jury

     Six people were indicted Jan. 7 by a LaRue County grand jury.

    Sara B. Gibbons(1975) of Hodgenville was charged with six counts of unauthorized procurement of controlled substance; theft by unlawful taking; six counts of forgery in the second degree; five counts of theft by unlawful taking; and second-degree persistent felony offender.

  • Minister's book deals with 'The Greatest Loss'

     After suffering what he calls “the worst thing a parent can experience,” Henry White is now using his experience to help others who are traveling the same path.

    White, pastor of Heavenbound Baptist Church in Elizabethtown and former director of Helping Hand, recently published a book, “The Greatest Loss – Ministering to Parents Who Lose a Child,” that discusses how ministers can provide aid to parents who have lost a child.

  • Upton man charged with assault

     Kentucky State Police arrested an Upton man Jan. 7 in connection to an October assault at a Cecilia Smith Mill Road residence.

    Jacob M. Walker, 22, is charged with second-degree assault. He also is accused of violating felony probation.

    According to a warrant, the victim went to the residence to speak to Walker. However, police said before a discussion occurred, Walker and two juveniles assaulted the man.

  • COLUMN: Rooster revived from ice storm

     I was awakened Christmas Eve morning by Russell Crow.

    Now before you start thinking, “my, my, that Linda was a really good girl this year,” let me explain.

    It was not the all-tingly voice of that hunky Australian actor Russell Crowe I heard. It was the crowing of our pet rooster Russell Crow who was thawing out in the basement – directly under the bedroom floor.

    It was annoying, but we were glad to hear that he was feeling better. For awhile, it looked like he was headed straight to the pot for dumplings.

  • COLUMN: Funerals call for closed mouths, open hearts

     Sometimes as we’re working in the office, we’ll engage in what some may consider to be offbeat conversations.

    Recently, we discussed funeral homes – and all the ways things can go wrong when well-meaning visitors descend on the bereaved.