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Today's News

  • Former John Deere dealer dies

    Sorrow touched the hearts of many in Shelby County last week with the loss of a man who was well-known not only as a local businessman for half a century but also for his generosity and love for his community.

    Joseph E. Burks, 89, was the husband of 66 years of Mary Anderson Burks, and father to Joseph E. II, Carl David, Mark Athel, John Jay Crittenden (deceased) and Paul Morgan Burks and Bonnie Burks Gray. He owned the John Deere dealership in LaRue County many years ago.

  • Lincoln Trail Behavioral Health System opens Military Unit

    When the new Military Unit at Lincoln Trail Behavioral Health System opens Feb. 1, those who serve our country will have a place to call home that meets their needs.
    “I think it’s important for people to know that with the Military Unit in place, we will have a separate unit for military, a separate unit for CD (chemical dependency) patients and a separate psychiatric unit,’’ LTBHS Chief Executive Officer Chuck Webb said. “It’s something that will be better for our military.’’

  • Family Fitness & Wellness Club schedule

    Family Fitness & Wellness Club

    6-7 p.m. at listed school location (Hodgenville Elementary or  Abraham Lincoln Elementary)

    Jan. 27          HES       Lower Body Conditioning

    Feb. 1            ALES     Kickboxing

    Feb. 3             HES      Walk/Fit Night

  • Scholarship opportunities

    Bluegrass Cellular

    Bluegrass Cellular, Inc. is accepting scholarship applications from graduating seniors who attend high school in its 38-county coverage area, which includes LaRue County. The deadline for applications is April 4.  Bluegrass Cellular will award 18 scholarships valued at $1,500 each. For guidelines and application, go to www.BluegrassCellular.com.

    Nolin RECC

  • Old photo identified as 'Ballinger School'

    Longtime reader Melanie Thompson identified the old photo published in the Jan. 19 issue of The LaRue County Herald News.

    The photo also ran in the Aug. 24, 1978 issue of the Herald News and Thompson’s grandmother had saved the information. Thompson and her daughter Mandy found the clipping while looking through a box of old photos.

  • National Issues Forum to be held in Campbellsville

    The University of Kentucky’s Cooperative Extension Service will host a National Issues Forum 10 a.m. Feb. 7 in Campbellsville.

    NIF is a result of a partnership between the Kettering Foundation and the National Issues Forums Institute. The purpose is to use the comments from the Forums as a method to communicate and inform national policy makers. 

  • Schools closed Friday

    LaRue County students will enjoy a long weekend as classes were called off Thursday in anticipation of the approaching snow storm and again Friday, after about 3-inches of snow fell on the area. That brings a total of eight days missed due to inclement weather this school year.

    The National Weather Service issued a Winter Storm Warning that ended at 1 a.m. Friday.

    Local and state crews have made good progress clearing main roads, but backroads are still slick. Drivers should use caution in intersections as well.

  • Fantasias welcome twins

    Frank and Deborah Fantasia of Hodgenville announce the birth of twins – a daughter, Rebecca Anne Fantasia and a son, Justin Thomas Fantasia.

    They were born Sept. 14, 2010, at Hardin Memorial Hospital.

    Rebecca Anne weighed 6 pounds 3 ounces and was 19-inches long.

    Justin Thomas weighed 6 pounds 2 ounces and was 19-inches long.

    They are welcomed home by siblings, Rachael, 11; Nicole, 8; and Joseph, 6.

    Maternal grandparents are Gary and Sally Bourgeault of Elizabethtown.

  • 74-year-old farmer puts out 6,000 pounds of leaf

    James Warren has been a part of burley tobacco farm production since before he was a teenager.

    Now, at 74 years old, he still raises 6,000 pounds of the leaf on his farm off Bennett Road, but he believes the tobacco companies will eventually snuff out small farm production in deference to the mega-crop producers, some of whom grow hundreds of thousands of pounds per year.

    “They’re docking us a nickel a bale when we sell our tobacco in small bales,” Warren said. “The bigger bales mean less labor at the receiving station.”

  • City Council at arms over dismissed tickets

    For more than two months, city officials have locked horns with a Hodgenville man over parking on Lincoln Boulevard.

    Greg Harry placed a “for sale” sign on his pickup truck and parked it in front of his house. Officers asked him to move it after receiving complaints from other residents. He complied, then changed his mind after conferring with County Attorney Dale Morris.

    Eventually, he was charged with illegal parking and the truck was towed.