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Today's News

  • Gaunt to serve 10 years for escape

    A Ludlow man will serve 10 years for his escape from the LaRue County Detention Center.

    A jury found George Richard Gaunt III guilty of second-degree escape, unauthorized use of a motor vehicle and of being a persistent felony offender last week.

  • FISCAL COURT: Two deputy jailers will be hired through agreement with Highway Department

    LaRue County Fiscal Court approved a memorandum of agreement with the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet that will allow the county to hire two deputy jailers to oversee 10 jail inmates as they work on state highway maintenance.

    Meeting at the courthouse in Hodgenville Nov. 23, Judge-Executive Tommy Turner told magistrates the agreement has several advantages for LaRue County.

  • EQIP and WHIP programs taking applications

    Each fiscal year, the Natural Resources Conservation Service sets ranking period dates for applications taken for USDA Farm Bill programs. Although ranking dates may vary from program to program, landowners may sign-up at any time for all conservation programs.

    The next ranking cut-off date is Jan. 28 and will include applications for both the Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program and the Environmental Quality Incentives Program.

  • WRESTLING: Mat Hawks look to State Tournament

    The LaRue County Mat Hawks have won four dual state championships, 11 regional championships and numerous tournament titles over the team's 21-year existence, but the team has never won the overall state tournament title. This is the year the coaches hope will end that drought.

  • MIDDLE SCHOOL WRESTLING: Hawks take third at Elkhorn

    On Saturday, the LaRue County Middle School Mat Hawks traveled to Elkhorn Middle School to compete in a 16-team dual competition. The Mat Hawks finished in third place defeating some top teams in the state in the process.

    “Saturday was a tough competition,” said head coach Dan Heady. “I was proud of the way we competed. We were missing two starters and had an injury during the day which meant we were short-handed for most of the day. The guys battled hard and we had a good showing.”

  • Upcoming sports

    LCHS golf meeting
    There will be a golf team meeting 7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 27 at the LaRue County Golf Course for any LaRue County student interested in playing golf this upcoming season. For more information, contact Jorge Venegas or Justin Craft at 358-2210.

    Chili supper before Homecoming

  • Mini-racer looking for track

    Willard Price, left, of Hodgenville, showed off a mini-late model racer he bought in Tennessee. The previous owner raced it at 411 Motor Speedway south of Knoxville. Price and his partner, Junior Puyear, along with other family members, drive it on a local track, getting it up to 33 miles per hour. On a larger track, it can reach 97 miles per hour. Price hopes a local track will form a class for the mini. If you are interested in racing minis, call Price at 765-9560.

  • ENGAGEMENT: Jordan Ashley Dudgeon and Dave Ross Atwell

    John and Joetta Dudgeon of Falls Of Rough announce the upcoming marriage of their daughter Jordan Ashley Dudgeon to Dave Ross Atwell of Greensburg.

    The prospective groom is the son of Denny and Debby Atwell.

    The wedding will be 5 p.m. Dec. 11 at Lincoln Memorial Baptist Church in Hodgenville.

    All family and friends are welcome. Invitations have been sent to out-of-town guests.

  • Readers assist with Bloyd's Cafe token mystery

    A couple of weeks ago, Tim Meredith contacted The LaRue County Herald News, seeking information about a token.

    His letter said: “A friend was searching through his pocket change for a soda and noticed a token from H.M. Bloyds Café, Hodgenville, in the mix. He, knowing I am a life-long resident of Hodgenville, gave it to me…. I wonder if anyone has heard of the business and possibly the location and era. The token lettering is in very good condition and the beer must have been cheap.”

  • COLUMN: This Christmas, look back at life's lessons

    When I was a child I celebrated Christmas the same way children celebrate today. I demanded the most expensive gifts, never clothes, and if I didn’t get what I wanted I threw a fit.

    After years of hearing my dad tell of how Christmas was when he was a kid, I finally woke up and listened.

    Dad lived in the country, down a dirt road, in Stephensburg. My Mamaw and Papaw were poor as a pluck-feathered hen. Papaw worked in the rock quarry down the road and Mamaw stayed home, raising eight kids in a two-bedroom house on a piece of land they called their home.