.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Two battles with diagnosis of ‘The Big C’

    The fifth in a series about
    local cancer survivors.
    In 1995, we had promised our two daughters that we would move to Kentucky in 1997. I began to cough. Two to three rounds of antibiotics — no change.  
    Then came such a whirlwind of medical activity — enough to make one dizzy — X-rays with contrast, bone scans, biopsies, etc. Then we got the diagnosis: the BIG C, upper right lobe of this non-smoker’s lung.

  • Teens take over at LaRue County Public Library

    The LaRue County Public Library has opened its doors to teens looking to have some fun.
    Teen Librarian Katie Wheatley has implemented two groups, Teen Monday, also known as Monday Funday, and the Anime Club.
    Teen Monday began in January and is filled with a variety of indoor and outdoor activities such as cornhole, crafts, games and relays. The group focuses on team activities and meets 3:30-4:30 p.m. every Monday at the library. Any teen interested in participating is welcome.

  • Flooding forces the hands of local farmers; tough decisions loom

    Flood waters bolstered by more than 20 inches of rain in a three week period are causing great concern for area farmers. The average rain fall per year for this area is 44 inches. Farmers in the area are now looking at options and making financial decisions, based on the fact that almost half of the year's precipitation fell in the month of April, putting planting of area crops behind schedule.

  • Cub Scouts take outing to MAM Candy

    Cub Scout Pack 210 visited MAM Candy last Tuesday night as our first outing within the community. Rooney Gray treated the scouts with an informative and tasty lesson on pulled cream candy. Each scout was given his own candy to pull and then enjoy the delectable treat.
    Gray told the Pack that Abe Lincoln once served this candy to his dinner guests back in the day.
    The boys were able to see the chemical change from a light brown color of the candy as it began to be pulled, and then subtly change to a creamy white.

  • Federal government moves to eliminate paper checks

    The U.S. Department of the Treasury is retiring the paper Social Security check for millions of baby boomers and others applying for federal benefits, a move that will save taxpayers $1 billion over the next 10 years.
    Beginning May 1, anyone newly applying for Social Security, Veterans Affairs or other federal benefits now must choose an electronic payment method – paper checks will no longer be an option.
    People currently receiving their federal benefits by paper check must switch to direct deposit by March 1, 2013.

  • Volunteers re-elect Rita Smith

    Sunrise Volunteers re-elected Rita Smith as president at the organization’s semi-annual meeting April 26 held in the local nursing home’s activities center.
    Smith with vice president LaDean Self and second vice President Ann Easton were voted into office by acclamation.
    Retired Sgt. Maj. Tony Rose was guest speaker at the meeting.  He told the audience of his career and duties at the Pentagon when Flight 77 crashed into the building where he was working on Sept. 11, 2001.

  • ENGAGEMENT: Laura Kasparie and Tim Lewis

    Laura Kasparie of Elizabethtown and Tim L. Lewis of Hodgenville announce their engagement and forthcoming wedding.
    The bride to be is the daughter of Johnny Thompson of Mount Sherman.
    The prospective groom is the son of Larry and Sally Lewis of Hodgen­ville.
    The wedding is 4 p.m. May 22 at Ovesen Heights Baptist Church in Hodgenville.
    All family and friends are invited to attend. Invitations are being mailed to out-of-town guests only.

  • Historic preservation work set for Lincoln sites

    Beginning May 3, a crew from the National Park Service's Historic Preservation Training Center (HPTC) in Fred­erick, Maryland, was to conduct masonry preservation work at the Sinking Spring site and Plaza Basin at the Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historical Park in Hodgenville. The work is expected to take five to six weeks. Although the masons will try to keep work sites open to the public, the stairs leading to the Sinking Springs will be closed when work begins there.

  • Old courthouse relics in rubble

    In 1967, the old LaRue County courthouse near the center of downtown Hodgenville was demolished.
    A need for space and deteriorating conditions led to the construction of a new courthouse on West High Street.  
    The county was not wasteful; many of the items that made up the old building were distributed amongst other agencies, facilities and citizens.

  • Wi-Fi available in downtown Hodgenville

    Downtown Hodgenville is now a Wi-Fi hotspot.
    The LaRue County Middle School Problem Solving Team began meeting in January and quickly decided to take on the task of making Wi-Fi accessible to LaRue County residents and tourists alike.
    The team, headed by Doris Jean Holleran and Tom Rossi, won the State Governors Cup competition in March for their problem-solving plan.
    With the help of Lincoln National Bank, team members have successfully implemented their problem solving strategy, allowing downtown visitors to reap the benefits.