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Today's News

  • COLUMN: Santa letters bring out the bad and the beautiful

    How are you sir? I’m fine. Since you’re a nice guy will you give the homeless houses to live in or money please? If I’ve been bad sorry cause I want toys and other stuf. How is Ms. Claus? Is she doing good? I hope so, if she isn’t than I’m sorry. How old is Rudolph? I bet hes old. If hes dead, than sorry. So what about his parents. Same thing I said last time. And say to the reindeer that I said “hi.” List of toys fish and make it were I can go to my dads and more toys. And well leave you some milk and cookies.
     

  • SCHOOLS CLOSED MONDAY AND TUESDAY

      As wintry weather enters the area, road crews have been busy clearing snow from roadways in LaRue County.

  • UPDATE: Unemployment insurance extension in jeopardy

    The following information is found at http://oet.ky.gov/des/ui/ui.htm.

     

  • LaRue County Farm Bureau awarded Gold Star

    LaRue County Farm Bureau received the 2010 Gold Star Award of Excellence for recent achievements in its Young Farmer Program during the recent Kentucky Farm Bureau annual meeting in Louisville. Caleb Ragland, representative for LaRue County Farm Bureau, accepted the award from Mark Haney, Kentucky Farm Bureau President.

     

  • Viers recounts life in Peace Corps

    Valerie Viers returned to her hometown of Hodgenville from a two-year Peace Corps stint in Jordan with the realization that though Arab culture and customs are quite different from those of Americans, people are basically the same everywhere.

    “The kids love to play the same games as our children, for example tag, and their version of duck-duck-goose,” said Viers, who served as an English teacher at a girls’ school there. “They watch American shows like Hannah Montana, Tom and Jerry and Sponge Bob Square Pants.

  • LaRue Schools receive Grissom Award

    Wednesday, the LaRue County school district received the second annual Dr. Johnnie Grissom Award (Strive for Achievement Through Instructional Equity) from the Kentucky Board of Education.

  • Former deputy jailer charged with sexual abuse

    A former LaRue County deputy jailer has been charged with numerous sex crimes against a young teen.

    James M. Curtsinger, 63, of Hodgenville, was charged Wednesday with first-degree sexual abuse, third-degree rape, third-degree sodomy and human trafficking, victim under 18.

    He is accused of having relations with a 15-year-old girl in December 2009, according to Kentucky State Police.

    Rhonda J. Brown, 54, of Hodgenville, who is related to the teen, was charged with complicity and promotion of human trafficking, victim under 18.

  • Case dismissed against three men in Marshall case

    The case against Kenneth C. Mattingly, Stephen Austin Howard and Maurice Greenwell for the 2009 murder of Donald Marshall has been dismissed, but the case will be reinstated at a later date pending the federal drug and gun trial of witness Nevelle Thompson.

    The decision to dismiss the trial was reached Tuesday afternoon at a pre-trial conference, according to Commonwealth Attorney Terry Geoghegan.

  • LCHS student starts book drive

    ‘Tis the season of drives – food drives, coat drives and toy drives.

    One LaRue County High School students has added a twist to those helpful collectibles – a book drive.

    Megan Smith, a junior, came up with the idea for a book drive while looking for a project to include with her application to become a Governor’s Scholar.  Students in the program – which can lead to fully-paid college tuition – are required to suggest a community project – but not complete it.

  • EDITORIAL: Newspaper's stance improves transparency in justice system

    Last week was a small victory for the public's right to know thanks to The Courier Journal, which played the important role of watchdog.

    All of it started when the CJ asked the state's court system why 3,600 cases had been sealed from public view during the last decade. Sadly when asked, the court system officials admitted they knew little about the cases - including why they were closed, if they were closed properly and if they should remain closed at this time.