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Today's News

  • City property tax rates increase by about 75 cents

    Hodgenville residents will see an increase of about 75 cents on their property tax bills this year.
    Mayor Terry Cruse recommended a 4 percent increase after a 15-minute hearing prior to the regular city council meeting. The council voted unanimously to approve. No members of the public attended the meetings.
    Property values have decreased and if a tax increase was not voted in, the city would lose money, Cruse said. The city took the compensating rate last year which brought in about $166 extra for the year.

  • Wally Sparks named fire chief

    Hodgenville City Fire Department has been appointed a new fire chief after the recent resignation of former chief, Terry Ovesen.
    Wally Sparks, a 13-year veteran to the department, took the helm Monday at the city council meeting.
    Sparks said he has three goals in mind for the department – to serve and protect the city of Hodgenville, to protect his firefighters and to bring the fun back in the fire department as a whole.
    “I’m not here to fix a flat tire,” said Sparks “I’m here to put on a new one and roll with it.”

  • METH: Seven charged as officers act on citizens' tips

    The LaRue County Sheriff’s Office and constables have been busy following up on tips about methamphetamine labs. In a two-day period, seven people have been charged with manufacturing or trafficking in the illegal drug.
    River Road
    A Bardstown man, already declared a fugitive by the Nelson County Circuit Court, is now facing charges of manufacturing and trafficking in methamphetamine.

  • HMH offers concussion assessment for athletes

    When an athlete suffers a concussion, how long should it be before he is allowed to return to the game?
    That’s a question that can be more accurately answered this year as LaRue County High School, in association with Hardin Memorial Hospital’s sports medicine program, is implementing a type of concussion assessment that can help to objectively evaluate the injured athlete’s condition and track recovery for safe return to play.

  • Blood drive at ALES

    Abraham Lincoln Elementary School hosted the University of Kentucky/University of Louisville Governor’s Cup Blood Drive Aug. 30. Red Cross, staff, student and PTO volunteers assisted donors. Beanbags, books and coloring activities were provided for youth while educational computer games were provided for teens. Donors received a T-shirt and earned a chance to a gas card or vacation by registering at www.redcrossblood.org. The blood drive drew more than 35 donors.

  • PHOTO: LCMS Homecoming court
  • School Calendar: Updated 0913

    ALL SCHOOLS
    Fall break – Oct. 3-7

    ALES
    Activities
    For more information, call the school at 358-4112.

    HES
    Hodgenville Family Resource Center Advisory Council meets
    Hodgenville Family Resource Center Advisory Council will meet noon Sept. 20 in the HES library. The public is welcome to attend. For more information, contact Melissa Pearman at 358-3506.

    LCHS
    Site-based council schedule

  • Local schools help the state earn award

    Kentucky was recently recognized as the distinguished 2011 “state of the year” by the National Energy Education Development Project for its state energy education program. The state’s program partnered with the Kentucky Utilities  Company and Louisville Gas and Electric Company’s Children’s Energy Education Program to help incorporate energy education into local schools.  

  • LaRue County high schoolers can earn college credit

    Imagine being in high school and taking a course that will not only count as one of your high school credits but also will give you three college credit hours.
    That dream is a reality at LaRue County High School, according to Rex Hanson, mathematics chairperson and one of several dual-credit teachers there.
    “The class is taught by a high school teacher during the regular school day,” he said.
    The program is in partnership with Campbellsville College. He teaches precalculus, which counts as college algebra and trigonometry credit.

  • COLUMN: Give infants and toddlers a good start with proper nutrition and outside play

    Recent findings indicate that even infants and toddlers are now at risk for becoming obese. Current national figures for infants and toddlers show that one in 10 is overweight and more than 20 percent of children between the ages 2 and 5 are already overweight or obese.
    Early obesity can lead to adult overweight or obesity and the chronic diseases that stem from weight management issues. Reversing this alarming trend is critical for parents or caregivers to ensure health for children as they grow up. Recommendations include the following: