Today's News

  • Massive die-off of Asian carp
  • Kaylan Anderson wins Stossel essay contest

     A LaRue County High School student has been named a semi-finalist in the Stossel in the Classroom essay contest.

    Kaylan Anderson, a freshman, wrote the essay in her Honors’ Social Studies class taught by Ben Schell. Her essay was one of the top-70 and the only winning entry from Kentucky, out of 6,767 essays submitted from around the country. Only 125 students were selected to win prizes.

    Anderson received a certificate of achievement and a check for $100.

  • Magnolia Bank earns 5-Stars

     Magnolia Bank has been recognized as a 5-Star Superior bank by BauerFinancial, Inc., Coral Gables, Fla., the nation’s leading bank rating and research firm. The data is based on Dec. 31, 2013, financial data.

    A 5-Star rating indicates that Magnolia Bank is one of the strongest banks in the nation. To earn the designation, the bank must excel in capital quality, asset quality and profitability.

    Magnolia Bank has earned a recommended rating of 5-Stars or 4-Stars for 98 consecutive quarters.

  • SPACE PLACE: Humanoid in space gets its legs

    The latest shipment to the International Space Station blasted off from Cape Canaveral, Florida late last month. On it was the usual cargo: repair parts, basic supplies, and a bunch of cool new experiments. But it also included something a little bit out of the ordinary – a pair of legs.

  • COLUMN: Raised beds an option for backyard gardeners

     Don’t let a sore back, bad knees or lousy soil stop you from gardening. Elevate your garden for easier access and better gardening results.

    The simple act of creating a raised bed improves drainage in heavy clay soil. Add in some organic matter to further increase drainage and improve the water holding ability for sandy soils.

    And if your soil is beyond repair or you don’t want to wait, a raised garden allows you to bring in quality soil and create a garden right on top of the existing soil or even paved areas.

  • NARFE meets

     Chapter 1050 of the Elizabethtown National Active and Retired Federal Employees met in April after a winter hiatus. Members brought paper products for Clarity Solutions Crisis Pregnancy Center and used books for sale to raise money for the Alzheimer's Association. 

    During the business meeting, Chapter president Mary Tom Haun shared information from April’s State Convention.

    NARFE will meet 11 a.m. May 5 at the Nolin RECC conference room. This will be a potluck meeting, so come prepared to share and feast on the food. 

  • Teacher, daughter identified as Botland victims

    Kathy Netherland and her daughter were killed in a double homicide, Kentucky State Police Post Four investigators released today just after 5 p.m.

    "Based on investigations and autopsies performed this morning at the State Medical Examiner’s Office, both deaths are being ruled as homicides," the release said. "The cause of death will not be released at this time."




    April 21


    University Drive Park in Elizabethtown


    Faizan Movania (E) def. Preston Howell (LC), 6-1, 6-0

    Ibrahim Siddiqui (E) def. Alex Best (LC), 6-0, 3-6, 10-8

    Ameer Haider (E) def. Cole Constant (LC), 6-4, 6-1


    Trevor Sanders/Kyler Hart (LC) def. Daniel Crain/Nathan Henson (E), 5-7, 7-6 (7-4), 10-5

  • Rifles, knives from Richie Farmer's administration to be auctioned

     The state will auction dozens of high-quality collector’s items left over from a 2008 agriculture conference during Richie Farmer’s tenure as Kentucky agriculture commissioner.

    The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources will sell 13 Remington rifles and 16 Case knives in an auction May 5 at KDFWR headquarters, 1 Sportsman’s Lane west of Frankfort. Proceeds from the auction will help fund an urban garden project that will be announced later this year.

  • Band of Hawks earns Distinguished rating, advances to state competition

     The LaRue County Band of Hawks recently performed at the Heartland Large Ensemble Festival Assessment in Elizabethtown. At the annual event, the band performs two pieces of music that have been rehearsed and prepared for performance. 

    Immediately following that portion of the assessment, the band is given a piece of music never seen before, allowed five minutes to look it over (without playing) and then performs it for an adjudicator. At the end of the day, all four judges scored the band at the Distinguished level.