Today's News

  • Freshman Lady Hawks raising expectations

    With each passing season at the high school level of competition a majority of the focus gets put on the varsity programs through newspapers, social media and word of mouth. 

    The LaRue County Lady Hawks Freshman Softball Team has certainly raised some eyebrows over the last few weeks while posting an 18-7 record including big wins over Central Hardin, Elizabethtown, Fairdale, Bullitt Central and North Hardin. This is an impressive turnaround from a 9-19 season last year.  

  • COLUMN: The bluebird returns to Groundhog Hill

    Groundhog Hill – Greetings, friends, family, connections. The garden has been recently plowed and is ready for planting. Another season is upon us, and I don’t know about you, but I am excited.

    Many thanks to my brother-in-law John Varney for his generosity and excellent tractor-work. Thanks to Johnny, the garden is now a blank canvas ready for a new season of creation.

  • Band's concert will honor veterans

    The LaRue County Band of Hawks will present their annual spring concert on Thursday, May 8 at First Baptist Church in Hodgenville. The concert begins at 7 p.m. will feature all the bands, from sixth grade through high school. 

    The concert will include a special salute to veterans of the Armed Forces. 

  • Editorial: Beshear's financial mess

    Last week the Paducah Sun published a picture of Health and Family Services Secretary Audrey Haynes holding a sign aside a beaming Gov. Steve Beshear proclaiming that 413,410 people have enrolled in Kentucky's Obamacare program. We suspect the reason Beshear is joyous is because he knows it will fall to a future governor to deal with the financial mess he has created.

  • COLUMN: First seeds of hemp to be planted in May

    The right to grow industrial hemp in Kentucky has faced many hurdles on the state and federal levels, but now it is legal to grow, and a new pilot project with the plant could be an economic boon for our state.

  • New law affects CDL drivers

    The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration will soon require drivers with Commercial Driver’s Licenses to be examined by medical professionals whom it has certified.

  • Master Cattlemen invited to join Cow College

    This summer, beef producers will get an opportunity to learn from University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment specialists and industry partners in a series of interactive sessions.

    Cow College is an intensive, hands-on course for experienced beef producers. It’s designed to expose them to the most cutting-edge techniques and ideas related to beef cattle production and business. The program is divided into four, two-day sessions and one single-day session in July, August and September.

  • Nelson deputy coroner resigns after alleged ethics violation

     A deputy Nelson County Coroner resigned Tuesday who had been serving for more than a year in violation of the county’s ethics ordinance.

    Nelson County Coroner Rayfield “Field” Houghlin asked his daughter, Rebecca, to resign, and she complied, following a complaint filed against him for nepotism with the Joint City-County Ethics Board.

    In a statement to the Standard, Houghlin said his daughter was qualified, with a degree in mortuary science.

    Rebecca was hired as a deputy coroner March 1, 2013. The position pays $300 a month.

  • New Haven woman receives probated sentence

    Christa Lynn Centers, 41, of New Haven was sentenced April 17 in Nelson Circuit Court.

    Centers was sentenced to two years in prison for receiving stolen property and two years in prison for tampering with physical evidence. The sentences shall be served concurrently. Centers was granted probation for a period of five years following set conditions pay a yet to be determined amount of restitution. On Oct. 12, Centers received and disposed of various household items and jewelry belonging to the estate of Martha Wells.

  • COLUMN: Poison-proof your home against these look-alike products

    Each year, poison centers across the United States receive more than 1 million calls about children being accidentally poisoned. Nine out of ten of the poisonings occur in the home. Many of the potential culprits for accidental poisonings are chemicals and cleaners used in our homes.