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Today's News

  • PHOTOS: Beef Producers
  • COLUMN: Three crosses on a hill

     Have you ever wondered why there were three crosses on Calvary? Why was Jesus placed on the center cross?

    The crosses on each side of Jesus represent the choice you and I must make. The choice we make determines how we live our life on earth and where we spend eternity.

  • ECTC celebrates love of words with Litfest

     Elizabethtown Community and Technical College is devoting an entire week to “LitFest! 2013: A Festival for the Love of Words.”

    Starting Monday, April 8, the college’s English Department, Fine Arts and Humanities Division and Multicultural Committee are celebrating words and literature with a variety of educational and entertaining events. 

  • JUST ASK: The chair

     Does anyone know what “the chair” represents?

    This wicker chair was tied to a tree behind the LaRue County Courthouse a couple of months ago.

    Two people at the courthouse had different explanations. One said someone from Our Lady of Mercy Catholic Church, adjacent to the courthouse, tied the chair to the tree for a church function.

  • Magnolia Bank provides scholarships

     Twenty sixth-grade students from LaRue and Hardin Counties were awarded the sixth annual Magnolia Bank “Preparing for Success” scholarships.

    Students were asked to write an essay telling what would make a great career, and how they plan to pursue that career. 

    “The goal of this program is to get kids and their families talking about college early.  We want to help students in our area get off to a good start saving for their future,” said Stefanie Rock, vice president at Magnolia Bank.   

  • TRACK: Lady Hawks learn teamwork

     The strength of this year’s LaRue County High School girls’ track team likely lies in the athletes knowing that there is always room for improvement, according to coach Laura Kudrna.

    “None of the girls come out thinking they know it all or that they are the sole individual to win it all for the team,” said the fifth-grade teacher at Hodgenville Elementary School, in her third year as coach. “We all know that everyone contributes to the team, whether it’s an individual event, relay or field.”

  • Turkey season begins in April

     With opening day of the statewide season just three weeks away, Kentucky turkey hunters can look forward to encountering gobblers of all ages this spring.

    “There will be a higher than average number of jakes (juvenile gobblers) compared to the 2-year-olds and older adult gobblers in our flocks,” said Steven Dobey, wild turkey program coordinator for the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources. “We should have another good spring season.”

  • COLUMN: Know your health numbers

     Our daily lives are flooded with numbers: PIN numbers, phone numbers and various account numbers. But there are also certain health numbers that can save and extend your life.

    • Cholesterol: less than 200mg/dl.

  • COLUMN: Thistle 'spray day' is April 10

     Musk or nodding thistle is the most common type of thistle locally. The primary growth period is in the spring and summer. However, most seed germinate in the fall and form a rosette which grows close to the ground, often growing unnoticed until spring.

    The most important step in long-term control of thistle is to prevent flowering, and the production and spread of new seed (which is carried by wind). This can be done by mechanical or chemical control.

  • Spring break: Free admission to Lincoln Museum

     The Lincoln Museum will kick off its 25th anniversary events with LaRue County Week during spring break, April 1-7. Admission is free to any LaRue County resident. 

    Children and adults can follow Lincoln’s footsteps and participate in a scavenger hunt during their visit. Every 25th visitor will receive a small gift.  Children under the age of 12 must be accompanied by an adult.

    The Lincoln Museum is open 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 12:30-4:30 p.m. on Sunday. For more information, call 270-358-3163.