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Today's News

  • ALES students prove 'we can care'

    Students at Abraham Lincoln Elementary School collected more than 1,000 canned goods last month to be donated to a local food pantry. About 500 cans were collected during the last week of the month.
    Staff and volunteers who had the job of counting and sorting the items were a bit overwhelmed. The front hallway at ALES was lined with cans: cans of asparagus, whole kernel corn, peas, soup, cranberry sauce and something called mini-o’s. There were brand name products and store brands.

  • Linwood Days is Saturday

    Linwood Days is Oct. 8 with a parade at 11 a.m. Other events include free flea market setups, silent auction, cornhole and basketball tournaments, backseat driver contest, bounce houses for children, cake walk and bingo.
    For more information, call Danny or Marlene Pippin at 270-528-3017 or Stephanie Elmore at 270-528-7495.
     

  • Sunrise Manor residents move to new facility

    “Here’s your new room.”
    That statement was made at least 122 times last Wednesday as Sunrise Manor Nursing Home residents moved into brand new living quarters.
    The transition from the 1967-era building to the spacious “big house on the hill,” as some staff members refer to it, was completed in a matter of hours.  

  • Brown furloughed until final sentencing

    A Hodgenville woman, charged in 2010 with human trafficking of a child under her care, has pleaded guilty to reduced charges.
    Rhonda Brown, 54, originally faced numerous other counts including first-degree sexual abuse and complicity; and third-degree rape and sodomy and complicity after a teenager accused her of making an arrangement with James Merritt Curtsinger, 64, of Hodgenville.
    According to allegations made in court records, Curtsinger paid Brown’s expenses in return for sexual favors from the teen.

  • Farm News: Updated 10-04

    Beef Producers meet
    The LaRue County Beef Producers will meet 7:30 p.m. Oct. 11 at the LaRue County Extension Office. The guest speaker will be 19th District State Representative Michael Meredith who serves on the Interim Joint Committee on Agriculture and the House Standing Committee on Agriculture and Small Business. A meal will be served. All interested producers are invited to attend.
     
    Kentucky Grazing Conference

  • 4-H Calendar: Updated 10-04

    Livestock Club
    The 4-H Livestock Club meets 6-8 p.m. Oct. 10 at the Extension Office. All youth planning to show livestock through 4-H must obtain a minimum of six hours of educational training by attending meetings. For more information, contact Misty Wilmoth at 358-3401.

    Cloverbuds meet
    The Cloverbuds (ages 5-8) meet 3:30-4:45 p.m. Oct. 11 at the Extension Office. The group is open to ages 5 to 8 or kindergarten through third grade.

    Poultry Club
    The 4-H Poultry Club meets 3:30-5 p.m. Oct. 11 at the Extension Office.

  • Adyani takes first place in LaRue County Farm Bureau Variety Show

    The LaRue County Farm Bureau Variety Show was held Sept. 24 in conjunction with the annual meeting.
    First place was Amanda Adyani singing Taylor Swift’s “Our Song.” She is the daughter of Bonnie and Jason Wolford. She will represent LaRue County at the Kentucky Farm Bureau District 3 contest on Nov. 3 in Grayson County.
    Second place was Rachel Sheffer with a dance performance of “To the Sky.” Third Place was Caleb Sheffer with a dramatic interpretation of “A Ref’s Point of View – Volger on the Line.”
     

  • Auction Academy graduate wins state FFA Auctioneering Championship

    Cody Howell of Hodgenville had his eye on winning the coveted FFA Kentucky State Auctioneering Championship for a long time.
    Just last year, good friend and fellow Kentucky Auction Academy graduate Alex Popplewell won the title and proudly displays the championship belt buckle every chance he gets. Now, the two good friends have matching trophies they can wear with their best pair of jeans and their blue corduroy jackets with the familiar FFA gold embroidery.

  • Fall wheat planting may not be wise

    Corn, soybean, and wheat prices (but not yields) have all done well this year.  As a result, grain farmers may be considering planting wheat this fall and follow with a soybean double crop. However, double-crop soybeans are more susceptible to summer drought and typically yield about 20 percent less than full season soybeans. Let’s consider an example of a planting decision and possible implications using a UK Ag. Economics web based decision aid.

  • Pumpkin crops do well despite extreme heat and lack of rain

    This year’s excessive heat and lack of rain hasn’t had a major effect on pumpkin and gourd crops, according to Becky Wilmoth of  “Wilmoth’s Pumpkins & More.”
    Wilmoth who owns the pumpkin patch with her husband, Eric and three sons Wade, 8, Levi, 9 and Trent, 17 said this year hasn’t been as bad as it could have been.
    “Most things did pretty well,” said Wilmoth. “Excessive heat and not enough rain caused a few things to not get as big as they usually would have.”