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Today's News

  • PHOTO: A&B Healthcare float receives People's Choice Award

     A & B Healthcare’s float “Fairytales and Leadership” won the People’s Choice Award Saturday at the Lincoln Days Parade. Pictured are Jennifer Collins, Dr. Amanda Florence-Houk and Amber Florence.

  • PHOTO: A&B Healthcare float is Mayor's Choice

     The A & B Healthcare float was presented the Mayor’s Award for the Lincoln Days Parade. Maverick Houk and his Super Heroes and Leadership float was the favorite of Hodgenville Mayor Terry Cruse.

  • PHOTO: Distinguished Alumni

    From left, David Walsh, Glen Rice, Tom Fulkerson and James D. LaRue Jr. were recognized as Distinguished Alumni of LaRue County School at a luncheon in their honor on Oct. 5 at the LaRue County Extension Office.

  • FOOTBALL: Hawks back on track with win over Henry County

    Since scoring 47 points in their season-opening win over the Adair
    County, the LaRue County Hawks have been in an offensive slumber.

    Entering Friday night, LaRue County had scored just 57 points in its
    next five games and gone 1-4 in that stretch.

  • ANNIVERSARY: Cundiffs celebrate 58 years

     Mattie and Joe Cundiff of Taylorsville and formerly of Hodgenville celebrated their 58th anniversary on Oct. 1, 2012.

    She is the former Mattie Mae Stearman.

  • PHOTO: New license

     Curtis Bennett, right, was the first LaRue Countian to receive a driver’s license issued by the new digital equipment installed at the LaRue Circuit Clerk’s office Oct. 5. The new license has several security features which make copying almost impossible. Larry C. Bell, LaRue Circuit Court Clerk, is at left.

  • COLUMN: Prussic acid poisoning possible

     Producers should be aware of the risk of cyanide or prussic poisoning in cattle, goats and other ruminants. 

    Sudangrass, johnsongrass, sorghums and sorghum-sudangrass hybrids contain cyanogenic glycosides. When the plant undergoes a stressful event such as cutting, wilting, freezing or drought, the plant cells rupture which allows the cyanogenic compounds to produce poisonous cyanide.

  • Beginning sewing classes offered this fall

     A series of four sewing classes will be offered in October and November for beginning sewers. No sewing experience is necessary. 

    The class is open to 4-H age youth, ages 9 to 18. Participants make a variety of items that can be used as holiday presents. The classes will be taught by Master Clothing Volunteer Judy Greenwell. 

    Class size is limited. Participants must call the Extension Office at 358-3401 to register to participate. Each participant must bring their own sewing machine or borrow one of the machines at the Extension Office. 

  • PLAY: Yankee vampire flaps into Bardstown

     The Bardstown Community Theatre has a new take on the Dracula legend.

    “The Count Will Rise Again or Dracula in Dixie” will be performed at the Bardstown/Nelson County Civic Center.

    The comedy horror spoof revamps the classic tale by introducing the villainous Count Dracula as a Yankee vampire from Pennsylvania.

    The action takes place on the plantation of Doc Stewart, a proper Southern gentleman physician who runs a kind of halfway house of “recovering politicians and other emotionally disturbed persons.” 

  • COLUMN: Reduce grocery costs and environmental waste

     In 2010, the single largest component of municipal solid waste sent to landfills was not paper or plastic, aluminum cans or glass, but food waste. Food waste includes uneaten food and food preparation scraps.

    It’s estimated that a family of four throws out nearly $600 worth of food each year. Food waste is not only hard on our pocket books, but also our environment.