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Today's News

  • ECTC Dean's and President's List

    Elizabethtown Community and Technical College has announced the names of students who made the Dean’s List and the President’s Honor List for the spring semester.

    The President’s Honor List is awarded to full-time and part-time students who are eligible based on the following criteria:

    Full-time degree-seeking students earning a 4.0 grade point average and successfully completing at least 12 hours of course work for the academic term, excluding developmental courses, are included in the full-time student President’s Honor List.

  • Communities getting 'work-ready'

    As communities look for an edge in today’s competitive global economy, there are few things as powerful as developing a high-quality workforce.

    Here in the Lincoln Trail region, it’s exciting to see multiple counties taking steps to develop a highly skilled workforce that is ready to go to work. Leaders in those counties have applied or are in the process of applying for Work Ready Community certification.

  • The Green River Project: Help Clean the Green

    The Nature Conservancy Kentucky Chapter and Kentucky Water Alliance are hosting a canoe paddle next month they call “Clean the Green.” The event offers three canoe routes on the Green River, in which participants will get to experience the outdoors and make a positive impact on the environment simultaneously.

  • Court Briefs - July 2014

    Guilty plea

    Louie Frank Corey (1958) pleaded guilty June 2 in LaRue Circuit Court to complicity, manufacturing methamphetamine; complicity, possession of controlled substance; and complicity, possession of controlled substance (meth); and complicity, buy or possession of drug paraphernalia. Recommended sentence is 10 years, three years, three years and 12 months respectively.

     

    Guilty plea

  • New Haven renames private roads

    At the New Haven Board of Commissioners’ meeting June 19, renaming private roads in the area was one of the main discussions. While nothing was listed on the agenda about the Street Department, Commissioner Freddy DeWitt brought up an issue that New Haven, and the rest of the county, is facing.

    DeWitt said private roads that do not have separate names from the street or road they are connected to will have to be renamed because they do not comply with E-911 addressing guidelines. He gave the example of a small connector on Henry Street.

  • That's what friends are for

    As soon as he swallowed, Chris Price knew he had literally bitten off more of the steak sandwich than he could chew.

    But, with several friends and hundreds of other people crowded around him at dinner tables at Louisville Slugger Field, spitting the morsel out was not an option, he decided.

    “I was too embarrassed to spit it out in my hand in front of everybody, so I decided to try to swallow it again,” he said.

    At that point, the steak, which had hung together by gristle, was partly down his esophagus attached to more in his mouth.

  • New Haven man sentenced to 8 years in meth case

    Timothy Aaron Ball, 29, of New Haven, was sentenced to eight years in prison for attempt to manufacture methamphetamine and 12 months in jail for possession of drug paraphernalia. Ball was granted probation for a period of five years following set conditions serve 240 days in the Nelson County Jail and pay restitution to the Greater Hardin County Narcotics Task Force. On May 16, Ball attempted to manufacture methamphetamine and possessed drug paraphernalia.

  • Judge denies request to permanently seal 'confidential communications'

    An attempt to permanently seal certain communications between former Hodgenville mayor Terry Cruse and former city clerk/treasurer MaDonna Hornback has failed.

    Ron Mather, the attorney representing Cruse and Hornback, submitted a memorandum last month in LaRue Circuit Court claiming messages of a personal nature between his clients were seized during an investigation by Kentucky State Police a year ago. He asked that the material “be returned or permanently sealed.”

  • Election dispute: Judge impounds ballots

    The special judge appointed to hear a lawsuit contesting the validity of a race in the May 20 primary election ordered the ballots impounded.

    Special David A. Tapp, a 28th Judicial Circuit judge who resides in Somerset, will preside over the case after two other judges were disqualified.

    Tapp will hold a preliminary hearing in the case July 8 in his Pulaski Circuit Courtroom. Tapp’s first order, issued June 19, was to impound the ballots in the 24th District House of Representatives race.

  • Fiscal court closes budget

    Monday, June 30, the LaRue County Fiscal Court held a brief special meeting to discuss closing the 2013-14 budget, the acceptance of an oil bid, and a revised copy of the health insurance renewals. The meeting was called to meet the deadline to close accounts at the end of the fiscal year