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Today's News

  • EMS hosts responder training

    LaRue County EMS will host a National Traffic Incident Management Responder Training Sept. 3 at its classroom on Lincoln Boulevard.

    Mike Cottrell, county EMS director, told magistrates meeting at the courthouse in Hodgenville Aug. 26 the four hours of instruction will provide guidelines to best protect emergency workers when working an accident.

    Cottrell said the recent I-65 accident that took the life of a Glendale volunteer fireman emphasized the need for such training.

  • Several indicted in Nelson County

    The following people have been indicted by a Nelson County grand jury. They are set for arraignment in Nelson Circuit Court Aug. 7.

  • School board tax rate hearing is Sept. 15

    The LaRue County School Board held a special-called meeting on Aug. 22 to discuss tax rates for the upcoming year. The board must decide how to determine the district’s tax rates. Their options are to either take a 4 percent increase or to take a “compensating rate,” a rate determined by the state that is designed to allow school boards and other entities to keep their current rates.

  • Coach Craft provides mid-season report

    The 18th District Cup Championship came to a close Monday as LaRue County hosted singles play at the 3,087 par 35 LaRue County Golf Club.

    There was a three-way tie for first place as sophomores Hunter McLaughlin and Cameron Dawson each shot a 39 while Hart County’s Matthew Atwell posted the same score.

    Final standings of the three-event cup championship: Hart County with 14 points, LaRue with 12 and Green Co. with 4 points.

    Mid-season report

  • Durbin fourth in Green All-Comers

    The LaRue County Cross Country Season got off to a “hot” start Thursday as the team traveled to Greensburg to compete in the six-team Green County All-Comers Meet. Temperatures exceeded 95 degrees, therefore the meet was modified to a 1.7 mile course instead of the usual 3.1 length.

    Both the girls and boys finished second overall in the six-team event.

    Senior Kristina Durbin came in fourth with a time of 12:18 in the modified event. Emily Pearman was seventh followed by Alexis Grimes (10th) and Clair Keller (13th).

  • Lady Hawks defeat C’ville, Thomas Nelson

    Aug. 25 – LaRue County 2 sets, Campbellsville 1 set

    The Lady Hawks were able to hold off the home-standing Lady Eagles 2-1 Monday night. LaRue won the first set 25-20 while Campbellsville answered with a 22-25 win to force the third and final set.

    The Lady Hawks responded with a 25-16 third set victory to secure their third win on the season.

    Junior Keeahna Bowen led the way with 20 assists and 5 aces. Allyson and Tessa Yingling both had seven kills for the Lady Hawks.

  • Sunrise Volunteers

    Next door to the old Sunrise Manor Nursing Home is a building that is still being used by Sunrise Manor. This building is the daycare center. Elderly persons stay there while their sons and daughters or guardians work in the daytime.

    I’ll bet you didn’t know that every Wednesday from 11 a.m. until noon, Sunrise Volunteers visit the elderly at the facility.

    Volunteers sing songs, tell jokes and stories and read articles. Volunteers and day time residents enjoy each other’s company and fun is had by all.

  • PHOTOS: Artwork by senior citizens
  • A new walk for a new man

    When you accept the grace of God by faith, trusting in the finished work of Christ on the cross for your sin, you become a child of God.

    Paul says in 2 Corinthians 5:17, “Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creature … all things have become new.”

    For the new Christian a metamorphose takes place like the caterpillar being transformed into a butterfly. Spiritually, we are a new person in Christ.

  • Automotive industry becomes regional point of pride

    For more than a century, America has had a fascination – a love affair, some say – with automobiles.

    Cars and trucks are more than transportation for us. In fact, few things are so deeply rooted in our culture. After all, most of us can hum the tune of “Little Red Corvette,” or “409” and recognize celebrity cars from Steve McQueen’s Mustang to Herbie the Love Bug.

    But part of what gives cars and trucks such a place in our hearts, especially in Kentucky, is our hand in making these celebrated machines.