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Today's News

  • Last day of school is May 28

     The last day of school for LaRue County students will be Thursday, May 28 – as long as the weather cooperates and no more days are missed.

    The LaRue County School Board voted Monday to amend the calendar, making up days lost to snow. Students have missed seven instructional days this year – but will make up only six.

  • Relay for Life moving to Lincoln Square

    LaRue County’s Relay for Life Committee is changing things up a bit this year with the May 30 event not only moving locations, but changing the time and entertainment focus.

  • Discovery of headstone may cause revisionist Lincoln history

    DECATUR – A recently uncovered headstone at Greenwood Cemetery in Decatur could rewrite part of the family history of Illinois' most famous figure.

    That headstone belongs to Mary Hanks, who was the second cousin of Abraham Lincoln. While history books say she was born in 1824 and was buried in 1843, the headstone suggests she was instead buried in 1813, which would make her the oldest recorded burial in Decatur and perhaps the oldest in the entire state of Illinois.

  • Drug overdose is leading cause of death in state

    Most Kentucky adults don't know that drug overdose is the leading cause of death in the state, but those in the east do.

  • More information released about Kinder-Morgan pipeline project

    As Kinder Morgan continues to take steps toward abandoning a portion of the Tennessee Gas Pipeline, the company has provided more information than ever before about the project.

    Recently, the Marion County Clerk’s Office received a DVD from Kinder Morgan that contains 53 files with more than 5,000 pages of information.

    Those records include a copy of the 34-page abbreviated application that the Tennessee Gas Pipeline LLC filed with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.

  • Filmmaker shows documentary of Thomas Merton

    Nineteen sixty-eight was “a beast of a year,” Thomas Merton wrote in his journal.

    U.S. soldiers torched villages in Vietnam, war resisters burned their draft cards and Buddhist monks immolated themselves.

    It seemed the world was on fire.

    But it also was a year of searching and discovery for Merton.

  • From Howardstown to High Grove, country stores anchor communities

    Tommy Roselle, co-owner of the Howardstown Mini-Mart with his wife, Carissa, enjoys some male camaraderie with his lunch guests. Clockwise, starting at Roselle's left, are Mark Underwood, Dean Higdon, Quinn Gray and Casie Wischmeier.

     Unlike many Kentucky counties, Nelson no longer has any of the old wooden country stores that date back to the 19th century, but High Grove Grocery comes close in atmosphere. Built around 1950, it still has the old hardwood floors and old gas pumps of yesteryear.

  • Anderson, Locke in top-3

    Two LaRue County High School seniors are among the top three winners in a literary analysis contest sponsored by the Robert Penn Warren Center at Western Kentucky University.

    Ben Locke captured second place and $100 while Brian Anderson received $50 for third place in the contest in which they wrote essays analyzing one of the poems by Kentucky-born writer Warren entitled, “Why You Climbed Up.” The poem first appeared in Warren’s book Altitudes and Extensions in 1984.

  • Ernst honored by E'town schools

    Caleb Ernst said he never knows how to respond to those who ask when he knew he wanted to be a teacher.

    “The decision to spend my life teaching didn’t happen at any specific moment,” he said. “It happened over a lifetime and it happens every day.”

    Ernst, an English teacher at Elizabethtown High School, was honored Friday as winner of Elizabethtown Independent Schools’ 2015 WHAS-TV ExCEL Award presented by LG&E Kentucky Utilities at the school.

  • Model A club visits Hodgenville

    A group of Model A enthusiasts descended on LaRue County Friday afternoon.

    About 30 members of the Central Kentucky Model A Restorers’ Club enjoyed the Lincoln sites – while sharing their love of their Fords with local residents.

    Jerry and Annnette Kelly drove from their home in Stanton, stopping at several other locations, before arriving on Lincoln Square. Their top speed in the four-cylinder 1930 Model A was 40 to 45 miles per hour.