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Today's News

  • Ye Old Courthouse Saga

    The LaRue County Courthouse turns 50 this year.
    The two-story red brick structure, located at 209 West High Street, is due for renovations outside and in. With maintenance and luck, it will last another 50 years.
    The construction of the courthouse was surrounded by controversy – from its location and cost – to the demolition of the “old courthouse” on Lincoln Square.
    A little history
    The old courthouse was demolished in 1966, according to a story and photo in The Herald News.

  • Bluegrass Pipeline releases easements

    Developers for the Bluegrass Pipeline pulled the plug on the controversial project last year  – and land transactions indicate the company is relinquishing claims in LaRue County.
    Letters were sent to several property owners stating:
    “Recently, Bluegrass Pipeline LLC decided that it will not pursue the Bluegrass Pipeline project. In light of this decision, we no longer have a need for the ... right of way agreement in the county land records, which will have the effect of extinguishing our easement rights on your property.”

  • ON EDUCATING LARUE: Summer activities planned by Kids' Crew

    Children in Kids Crews’ summer program need to look no further than into a mirror to find Super-Heroes.

    “Our summer program entitled ‘The Super Hero in Me’ begins June 1 and will include many different indoor and outdoor activities to help the children find the ‘super hero’ within themselves,” explained Janet Campbell.

    Learning opportunities abound each weekday. The children will do craft projects, learn good nutrition, music, dance, drama, yoga and even tae-kwon-do.

  • Filmmaker shows documentary of Thomas Merton

    Nineteen sixty-eight was “a beast of a year,” Thomas Merton wrote in his journal.

    U.S. soldiers torched villages in Vietnam, war resisters burned their draft cards and Buddhist monks immolated themselves.

    It seemed the world was on fire.

    But it also was a year of searching and discovery for Merton.

  • ON EDUCATING LARUE: It's scholarship time

    As every high school student seeking to go to college and his parents know, college is expensive and becoming more costly.

    A comparison of state and private colleges and universities in Kentucky for in-state students (source:  U.S. Department of Education’s 2013-14 IPEDS Survey) showed the cheapest cost for a year (includes tuition, room and board or estimated off-campus living expenses, books, supplies, and other fees) was $14,266 for a state school with prices ballooning to over $46,000 annually for a private college.

  • From Howardstown to High Grove, country stores anchor communities

    Tommy Roselle, co-owner of the Howardstown Mini-Mart with his wife, Carissa, enjoys some male camaraderie with his lunch guests. Clockwise, starting at Roselle's left, are Mark Underwood, Dean Higdon, Quinn Gray and Casie Wischmeier.

     Unlike many Kentucky counties, Nelson no longer has any of the old wooden country stores that date back to the 19th century, but High Grove Grocery comes close in atmosphere. Built around 1950, it still has the old hardwood floors and old gas pumps of yesteryear.

  • Last day of school is May 28

     The last day of school for LaRue County students will be Thursday, May 28 – as long as the weather cooperates and no more days are missed.

    The LaRue County School Board voted Monday to amend the calendar, making up days lost to snow. Students have missed seven instructional days this year – but will make up only six.

  • Saul Marin finds his niche in track

    For many of us, finding our niche in a particular task takes a long time. Some of us find it early in life, while others find it later. I am always seeking out students who are not involved in activities to consider giving a sport a try in hopes they will find their niche. 

    Most of the time I point them in the direction of track, simply because there are 14 events in which kids have an opportunity to excel. For Saul Marin, a freshman at LaRue County High School, it appears he has found his niche in track.

  • Fair Board wants free water

    For many years, the City of Hodgenville provided free water and sewer service to the privately-owned LaRue County Fairgrounds.
    A change in administration led to a change in policy last summer – and an end to the free service.
    Monday night, several Fair Board members appealed to City Council to reinstate the agreement.
    Sandy Bell, fair board treasurer, described the fairgrounds as “nonprofitable.”
    The last water bill for the fairgrounds was $1,009 – and Bell said she had to borrow the funds to pay it.

  • Discovery of headstone may cause revisionist Lincoln history

    DECATUR – A recently uncovered headstone at Greenwood Cemetery in Decatur could rewrite part of the family history of Illinois' most famous figure.

    That headstone belongs to Mary Hanks, who was the second cousin of Abraham Lincoln. While history books say she was born in 1824 and was buried in 1843, the headstone suggests she was instead buried in 1813, which would make her the oldest recorded burial in Decatur and perhaps the oldest in the entire state of Illinois.