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Today's News

  • Families wait for call to ‘feud’

    History has had its share of feuding families — the Hatfields and McCoys, the Montagues and Capulets, the Ewings and Barnes.

    The Glen Rice family of Buffalo is hoping to be another feuding clan — this time, however, as participants in the Family Feud television program.

    His daughters – Tiffany Spratt, Teri Lynn Rice Dandy, Karen Michelle Ward – and wife, Peggy, were among the estimated 5,000 people who auditioned for the show Feb. 7 and 8 at the Kentucky International Convention Center in Louisville.

  • Family loses home to fire

    Angie Pitchford left her home on West High Street Monday morning to return books to the library – just down the street. She returned home to find the two-story frame house covered in heavy smoke.

    “The library books were overdue,” she said. “We were renewing them so we could keep checking out.”

  • More arrests made in Lyons Station

    A Lyons Station man was charged Feb. 12 with several counts.

    Matthew Reece O’Bryan, 19, was charged with first-degree possession of a controlled substance; possession of a controlled substance, third degree; tampering with physical evidence; possession of marijuana; buy or possession of drug paraphernalia; illegal possession of legendary drug; first-degree forgery; and criminal possession of a forged instrument.

  • Octavia brings memories of winter ‘78

    February 2015 is headed for the record books as the National Weather Service says it will be one of the worst in the state’s history.

    LaRue County was hit with 12-to-14-inches of snow on Feb. 16 – and an additional 2-to-3 inches falling overnight Tuesday, courtesy of Winter Storm Octavia. An Arctic cold blast later in the week meant the snow wasn’t going anywhere. Wind chill advisories were issued Wednesday.

  • Former city officials report to jail

    Despite the snow, former Hodgenville mayor Terry Cruse and former city clerk MaDonna Hornback reported Monday as scheduled to Nelson County Jail in Bardstown to begin serving their 30-day sentences.

    The two pleaded guilty in Nelson Circuit Court to multiple felony counts a week ago for inappropriate use of the city’s credit cards to fuel personal vehicles and claiming mileage for which the two were ineligible.

  • Carman named Wrestler of the Week

    B.J. Carman of New Haven was last week named the NAIA (National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics) National Wrestler of the Week. The Saint Catharine grappler was chosen based on his performances Feb. 9-15. This is the seventh and final weekly award of the 2015 season.

    The 197-pound freshman is a graduate of LaRue County High School. He has a 24-9 overall record this season.

  • Woman recovering after being struck by truck

    A New Haven woman was injured Wednesday, Feb. 18, when she was struck by a pickup.

    Kenneth Goodgine, 57, of Bardstown, was driving a 1991 Chevrolet extended cab truck north on Bardstown Road in the Athertonville area. About 7:10 p.m. the pickup met a southbound truck “that had bright lights,” according to a sheriff’s report.

  • Locals featured in insurance commercial

    The latest television commercial for Kentucky Farm Bureau features fall scenery, catchy guitar music and a soft, Southern voice saying, “All over Kentucky, people grow attached to certain things.”

    One by one, six smiling people show off garden gnomes, hubcaps, typewriters and stuffed animals.

    Much of the 30-second spot was filmed in LaRue County, features two LaRue Countians and was developed by a native LaRue Countian.

  • Cox's Creek woman drowns in cistern

    Nelson County first responders battled freezing temperatures and hazardous roads Monday while responding to a drowning at a Cox’s Creek farm on Whitesides Road.

    Nancy Dugan, 56, was found drowned in a cistern on her farm at 1845 Whitesides Road.

    Nelson County Sheriff Ed Mattingly said in a press release that foul play is not suspected. An autopsy is scheduled Wednesday at the state medical examiner’s office, after which a preliminary report on the cause of death is expected.

  • Carl Brashear: a true ‘man of honor’

    “It is not a sin to get knocked down. It’s a sin to stay down.”

    Those are the words that run along the top of carlbrashear.org, a website for the Carl Brashear Foundation. And they’re words Carl Brashear lived by. As the first African American Master Diver in the U.S. Navy, Brashear opened doors to the military for the rest of the black population.